Football player from Kaysville continues family legacy at BYU

Tuesday , May 05, 2015 - 1:47 PM

By CALEB LARKIN
Standard-Examiner correspondent

PROVO – Davis High’s three-year starting quarterback is now looking to make a career on the other side of the football.

Gavin Fowler, 22, from Kaysville, at 6 feet, 190 pounds, will play defensive back for the Cougars this fall. Fowler was a three-year starter for Davis High School from 2008 to 2010.

In 2011, Fowler began his playing career at BYU, expecting to continue as quarterback. However, BYU quickly transitioned him to defense. He had never played free safety and felt a little inexperienced. He feels this spring he finally received the coaching needed to make an impact as a defensive leader for BYU.

Fowler comes from a family with a long history of football players. His grandfather, father, and two brothers also played for the Cougars. His father played quarterback, but both his brothers played defensive back. He now finishes the BYU football legacy for his generation.

“My family just loves football. I remember being so anxious to play I would get my fake helmet and pretend to play on the sidelines at my brothers’ games,” Fowler said.

Fowler’s dream had always been to play for Brigham Young, following the examples in his family. “In high school when other colleges made me offers it took away my interest for a little bit, but I always knew I’d come here (to BYU),” Fowler said.

He had been bred to play for the Cougars. Ever since childhood Fowler recalls never missing the BYU football games. His father, Blaine Fowler, who played for the Cougars from 1981 to 1985, now works in broadcasting at BYU as a sports analyst. BYU football has been a constant for him.

Yet Fowler says the players were the real reason he chose BYU. “They were all just like my brothers, people I looked up to,” said Fowler. “Knowing there was a team full of those guys really drew me to BYU.”

Fowler has high expectations for the 2015 season. Even if he will be on the bench for the first part of the season. Fowler tore his ACL at the end of spring training. The normal recovery time for that injury is five to six months. “I just hope I’m back soon enough to be a part of it [the 2015 season],” Fowler said.

He believes the recent coaching changes and increase in leadership roles on the team will make a difference this fall. “We had good players last year, but now we’ve got some real leaders,” Fowler said.

BYU’s defensive backfield has a lot of young players. Fowler explained the inexperience could be seen as a weakness, but he believes it’s more of an “unknown.” He feels the biggest strength that will help the Cougars succeed and overcome setbacks is unity. Fowler described the bond between players as “cohesive” and stronger than in past years.

Fowler discussed how three years of high school football prepared him for BYU. “It was really exciting to be out there on that kind of stage, especially being younger,” said Fowler speaking of his first high school game as a sophomore. He remembers his time at Davis as “triumphal.”He attributes his success in large part to the relationships he developed with other players and the examples his coaches set for him.

He has high hopes for his football career. “The simplest way I can put it is I want to be the best football player I could possibly be. I want to work hard enough, that by the end of my career I became the best player, leader, and person that I could be,” Fowler said.

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