Joan Lowy

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Public bus seat belts still on hold 45 years after recommendation

FILE - This March 2, 2007 file photo shows a charter bus carrying the Bluffton University baseball team from Ohio after it plunged off a highway ramp early in Atlanta and slammed into the I-75 pavement below. Safety advocates compare the buses to commercial airlines, which have even fewer deaths and injuries but still require passengers to buckle up. Many buses seat more than 50 passengers, about as many as a regional airliner. And the nation’s fleet of 29,000 commercial buses transports over 700 million passengers a year, roughly equivalent to the U.S. airline industry. Commercial bus operators fought seat belts for decades, but opposition began to weaken after this 2007 crash in which a bus carrying Ohio’s Bluffton University baseball team plummeted off a highway overpass near Atlanta. Five players, the bus driver and his wife were killed. Twenty-eight others were injured, including some students who are still trying to put their lives back together seven years later, said John Betts of Bryan, Ohio, whose son, David, was among those killed. (AP Photo/Gene Blythe, File)

Joan Lowy, The Associated Press
Nov 12 2013 - 1:32pm

WASHINGTON -- After a drunken driver on a California highway slammed into a bus carrying passengers to Las Vegas, killing 19, investigators said a lack of seat belts contributed to the high death toll. But 45 years later, safety advocates are still waiting for the government to act on seat belts and other measures to protect bus passengers.

Comments   ·   Read more   ·   Updated: Nov 12 2013 - 1:36pm


FAA lifts restrictions on gadget use

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Administrator Michael Huerta announces that government safety rules are changing to let airline passengers use most electronic devices from gate-to-gate during a news conference, Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, at Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport. The change will let passengers read, work, play games, watch movies and listen to music _ but not make cellphone calls. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Joan Lowy, The Associated Press
Oct 31 2013 - 1:34pm

WASHINGTON -- Airline passengers will be able to use their electronic devices gate-to-gate to read, work, play games, watch movies and listen to music - but not talk on their cellphones - under much-anticipated guidelines issued Thursday by the Federal Aviation Administration.But passengers shouldn't expect changes to happen right away, FAA...

Comments   ·   Read more   ·   Updated: Oct 31 2013 - 2:37pm


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