Nine candidates face Kaysville primary

Sep 2 2011 - 11:15pm

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Barton
DeCaire
Draney
Garlick
Johnson
Lee
Rosier
Stephens
Barton
DeCaire
Draney
Garlick
Johnson
Lee
Rosier
Stephens

KAYSVILLE -- A full field of city council candidates with a wide range of political experience and views are competing in the Sept. 13 primary, with the top six vote-getters advancing to the Nov. 8 general election.

The top three finishers in the general election will capture a four-year seat on the council.

The field of candidates consists of incumbent Councilmen Brett Garlick, Mark D. Johnson and Ron Stephens, along with challengers Richard Rosier, Christian Nielsen, Susan Lee, Orwin Draney, Stroh DeCaire and Ronald Barton.

Barton, 59, said he is seeking office for the first time out of concern about how the city is using revenues from its city-owned power company to operate the general fund.

"To me, it's deceptive to say we have maintained and kept taxes low," said Barton, while "gouging" customers over utility rates. "I feel the past city councils have not stepped up to the plate to manage the city."

Draney, active in the group Kaysville Citizens for Responsible Government has similar concerns.

Millions of dollars from the city's power fund have been transferred to the city's general fund without public hearings being held, said the 75-year-old Draney.

"I see some changes that need to be made," he said.

DeCaire, who served in the U.S. Air Force for seven years and is now an engineer, said he is seeking office because he has always had an interest in politics.

"My father holds public office in Michigan. It is kind of in our blood," said the 40-year-old DeCaire, who for the past few years has been involved in helping organize the city's Fourth of July parade.

Lee, a wife and mother, said she is seeking office because Kaysville is at a point where it needs people on the council who will vote against tax and rate increases.

"It's time for conservative values and principles," said Lee, 46, who is a political newcomer but longtime city resident.

"I don't have political axes to grind," said 47-year-old Rosier, a member of the Kaysville Planning Commission.

However, if elected, Rosier said he would like to increase the dialogue that occurs among city leaders.

"It's good that quite a number of people are participating," he said of the large field of candidates.

Rosier said he is pleased by the number of candidates who filed to run.

Johnson agreed, saying, "I'm glad there is a lot of interest in serving the community."

The 53-year-old LDS Church seminary teacher was originally appointed to the council in February 2006 before being re-elected in 2007.

"I enjoy the city and enjoy working with the council and the community," Johnson said.

One of the things he enjoys most is working with Kaysville City Youth Court, he said.

"I feel good about our team," said Stephens, seeking a second term on the council.

Stephens, 78, a former educator, said he would like to better balance Kaysville's tax revenues by adding commercial business that is compatible with the philosophy of the community.

Garlick, appointed to the council in January to replace former Councilwoman Ally Isom, could not be reached for comment.

"Kaysville deserves to be represented by individuals who have the same values, the same ethics, and someone willing to stand up for them," Garlick said on the city's "meet the candidates" website.

Nielsen could not be reached for comment and has provided no information to the city for its candidate website.

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