Buyers, sellers could enjoy Ogden farmers market another month

Oct 1 2011 - 10:14pm

Images

(ERIN HOOLEY/Standard-Examiner) Juliana Stapley sells produce from Tagge’s Famous Fruit of Brigham City at the Historic 25th Street Farmers & Art Market in Ogden on Saturday. The market has extended its season because of the amount of fresh produce still available from local farms.
(ERIN HOOLEY/Standard-Examiner) Raspberries from Tagge’s Famous Fruit of Brigham City prove to be a popular purchase at the Historic 25th Street Farmers & Art Market in Ogden on Saturday.
(ERIN HOOLEY/Standard-Examiner) Valerie Koyle sells corn from Mountain Country Produce of West Point at the Historic 25th Street Farmers & Art Market in Ogden on Saturday. The market has extended its season, possibly to the end of the month.
(ERIN HOOLEY/Standard-Examiner) Retired Ogden police officer Ron Gardiner and his horse, Sundance, visit with people at the Historic 25th Street Farmers & Art Market in Ogden on Saturday. Gardiner took in the horse and has trained it to do all sorts of tricks for the amusement of the crowd most Saturdays.
(ERIN HOOLEY/Standard-Examiner) Juliana Stapley sells produce from Tagge’s Famous Fruit of Brigham City at the Historic 25th Street Farmers & Art Market in Ogden on Saturday. The market has extended its season because of the amount of fresh produce still available from local farms.
(ERIN HOOLEY/Standard-Examiner) Raspberries from Tagge’s Famous Fruit of Brigham City prove to be a popular purchase at the Historic 25th Street Farmers & Art Market in Ogden on Saturday.
(ERIN HOOLEY/Standard-Examiner) Valerie Koyle sells corn from Mountain Country Produce of West Point at the Historic 25th Street Farmers & Art Market in Ogden on Saturday. The market has extended its season, possibly to the end of the month.
(ERIN HOOLEY/Standard-Examiner) Retired Ogden police officer Ron Gardiner and his horse, Sundance, visit with people at the Historic 25th Street Farmers & Art Market in Ogden on Saturday. Gardiner took in the horse and has trained it to do all sorts of tricks for the amusement of the crowd most Saturdays.

OGDEN -- Vendors, particularly those selling tasty tomatoes, scrumptious squash, plump pumpkins and other fruits and vegetables, were doing brisk business Saturday at the Historic 25th Street Farmers & Art Market.

The market will likely remain open the rest of the month to take advantage of the late growing season.

Pete Hernandez, owner of Pete and Sons Produce in Syracuse, said keeping the market open longer is helping him move a lot of late-season corn, cantaloupe and watermelon.

He would like to see the market remain in operation through October permanently. "I hope they (the operators) of the market do it."

West Haven resident Kay Spargur, who was shopping at the market Saturday, said she's glad to be able to still buy locally grown produce so late in the growing season.

"It's good to get it when it's freshest," she said.

Even vendors who don't sell fruits and vegetables said they are benefiting from the market being open longer.

Erica Hendrickson, who sells handmade jewelry, hair clips and accessories, said the cooler temperatures typical of October make shopping more pleasant for customers.

"I've seen more people (at the market)," she said.

The market was originally set to close after Sept. 24, but a wet spring that prompted the late growing season will keep it open the rest of October, weather permitting.

Saydee Barragan, who is the market's coordinator, said there has been tremendous positive response from vendors and the public to keep the market open.

Dan Musgrave, executive director of Downtown Ogden Inc., which operates the market, said the support has been so strong, the market may operate through October again next year.

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