Will teens eat bison burgers over hamburgers?

Jan 13 2012 - 11:23am

Images

In this Jan. 5, 2012 photo, Geriann Headrick, acting food service manager at the Flandreau Indian School in Flandreau, S.D., cuts bison meat. The school began preparing school meals with fresh bison meat this year as part of a project between the Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe and South Dakota State University researchers to restore the cultural significance of the animal and consumption of bison meat among community members, particularly the youth. Through cooking demonstrations and educational outreach opportunities, the students are learning that there are healthier _ and tasty _ options available that also connect them to their ancestors. (AP Photo/Kristi Eaton)
In this Dec. 7, 2011, photo tacos prepared with bison meat by Flandreau Indian School students are shown during a food demonstration and workshop at South Dakota State University in Brookings, S.D. The Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe, from Flandreau, SD, is working with SDSU researchers to restore the cultural significance of the animal and consumption of bison meat among community members, particularly the youth. (AP Photo/Padu Krishnan, South Dakota State University)
In this Dec. 7, 2011, photo Flandreau Indian School students Deshae Greeley, left, Kevin Lahi, center, and Joseph Stillions, a food science student at South Dakota State University, use bison to prepare meat patties at SDSU in Brookings, S.D. The students are part of a pilot project started by the Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe, from Flandreau, S.D., and SDSU researchers to restore the cultural significance of the animal and consumption of bison meat among community members, particularly the youth. (AP Photo/Eric Lanwehr, South Dakota State University)
In this Jan. 5, 2012 photo, Geriann Headrick, acting food service manager at the Flandreau Indian School in Flandreau, S.D., cuts bison meat. The school began preparing school meals with fresh bison meat this year as part of a project between the Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe and South Dakota State University researchers to restore the cultural significance of the animal and consumption of bison meat among community members, particularly the youth. Through cooking demonstrations and educational outreach opportunities, the students are learning that there are healthier _ and tasty _ options available that also connect them to their ancestors. (AP Photo/Kristi Eaton)
In this Dec. 7, 2011, photo tacos prepared with bison meat by Flandreau Indian School students are shown during a food demonstration and workshop at South Dakota State University in Brookings, S.D. The Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe, from Flandreau, SD, is working with SDSU researchers to restore the cultural significance of the animal and consumption of bison meat among community members, particularly the youth. (AP Photo/Padu Krishnan, South Dakota State University)
In this Dec. 7, 2011, photo Flandreau Indian School students Deshae Greeley, left, Kevin Lahi, center, and Joseph Stillions, a food science student at South Dakota State University, use bison to prepare meat patties at SDSU in Brookings, S.D. The students are part of a pilot project started by the Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe, from Flandreau, S.D., and SDSU researchers to restore the cultural significance of the animal and consumption of bison meat among community members, particularly the youth. (AP Photo/Eric Lanwehr, South Dakota State University)

FLANDREAU, S.D. -- It seems an unlikely concept: teenagers forgoing the immediacy of a McDonald's Big Mac to learn how to cook their own lower-fat version.

But that's what some students at the Flandreau Indian School in South Dakota are doing, and it has a deeper significance. The experience is teaching them about bison, an animal considered sacred in their Native American culture.

The students are part of a pilot project started by the Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe and South Dakota State University researchers to restore the cultural significance of the animal and consumption of bison meat among community members, particularly young people.

Through cooking demonstrations and educational outreach, the students are learning that healthier and tasty options are available that also connect them to their ancestors.

 

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