Lego building club the place to be after school in Kaysville

Mar 5 2012 - 7:47am

Images

(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) Dallin Shaeffer and Joshua Vincent build a Lego pirate ship at Endeavour Elementary School in Kaysville.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) Gaucho Anderson (from left), Jacob Wofford and Caleb Yancey make a castle.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) The building room is quite busy.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) Brycen Nacey, Noah Bowcut and John Austin make a spaceship.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) Dallin Shaeffer and Joshua Vincent build a Lego pirate ship at Endeavour Elementary School in Kaysville.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) Gaucho Anderson (from left), Jacob Wofford and Caleb Yancey make a castle.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) The building room is quite busy.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) Brycen Nacey, Noah Bowcut and John Austin make a spaceship.

KAYSVILLE -- School just can't end quickly enough on Wednesdays for 50 students at Endeavour Elementary School.

That's because a new Lego Club has become the coolest thing in the school -- featuring a unique space-themed feel and design -- known for being pretty cool anyway.

"I just heard from so many kids that it was the best day of the week," said Principal Beth Johnston. "They were so excited. We have some kids that this is their obsession."

That definitely fits one of the club members, who, in the weeks prior to the club's first meeting, asked his parents daily if he could join.

"My son, Colin, told the principal that it was the best day of his life," said Emily Schoenwald.

Colin said he has about 25 large Lego sets at home and likes the chance to play with Legos at school instead of just at home.

"It gives me ideas on what I can do with my Legos," Colin said. "My favorites are Ninjagos and Star Wars."

Troy Butcher and Gabe Griffin, two fathers of students at the school, are in charge of the club. They initially held a chess club after school, but once they taught the kids all they knew about chess, they needed a new plan.

So they decided on Legos.

"We were just trying to think of something that would be interesting to the kids, that would entertain them for several weeks," said Butcher, whose second-grade daughter, Kira, is in the club. "We put them into teams to build some of the bigger sets. We thought that the whole teamwork thing would go good for them as well."

They were right.

On Feb. 22, the first day of the eight-week class, students poured into the room and anxiously awaited the time to build. Then, when Butcher arrived with the 14 deluxe Lego kits, the kids cheered as if they were at a football game.

"Even though the kids have Legos at home, they don't have 14 sets to chose from," Johnston said.

There is a $35 class fee, and that money went toward purchasing the kits. At first, organizers were worried that they would not get enough interested students to pay for the new toys.

The class is open to second- through fifth-graders.

"We thought, if don't get enough kids, we'll take some of the kits back," Johnston said. "But we had 50 kids join. We even had to turn some away."

Those who were not quick enough to sign up for this session still have a chance to join the club. Johnston said there will be another session in a few months.

Schoenwald said this club is just another example of how Endeavour provides activities and learning opportunities for kids with all types of interest.

She said, "Legos control (Colin's) life, so it's nice because it gives him a social outing, an activity, and he's surrounded by his friends and doing a fun thing."

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