Association honors Weber County chief deputy killed in 1908 with new memorial

Jun 29 2012 - 9:45pm

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(From left) Deputy Sheriff's Association President Chad Allen and Sheriff Terry Thompson watch as Frank and LuDene Dallimore unveil the Fallen Officers' Memorial at the Weber County Sheriff's Office in Ogden on Friday.  (KERA WILLIAMS/ Standard-Examiner)
Sheriff Terry Thompson speaks before the unveiling of the Fallen Officers' Memorial at the Weber County Sheriff's Office in Ogden on Friday, June 29, 2012.  (KERA WILLIAMS/ Standard-Examiner)
Sheriff Terry Thompson speaks before the unveiling of the Fallen Officers' Memorial at the Weber County Sheriff's Office in Ogden on Friday, June 29, 2012.  (KERA WILLIAMS/ Standard-Examiner)
(From left) Deputy Sheriff's Association President Chad Allen and Sheriff Terry Thompson watch as Frank and LuDene Dallimore unveil the Fallen Officers' Memorial at the Weber County Sheriff's Office in Ogden on Friday.  (KERA WILLIAMS/ Standard-Examiner)
Sheriff Terry Thompson speaks before the unveiling of the Fallen Officers' Memorial at the Weber County Sheriff's Office in Ogden on Friday, June 29, 2012.  (KERA WILLIAMS/ Standard-Examiner)
Sheriff Terry Thompson speaks before the unveiling of the Fallen Officers' Memorial at the Weber County Sheriff's Office in Ogden on Friday, June 29, 2012.  (KERA WILLIAMS/ Standard-Examiner)

OGDEN -- More than a century ago,

a man shot and killed Weber County Chief Deputy Seymour LeGrande Clark, who was investigating a trespassing.

His memory and sacrifice are finally immortalized.

Outside the Weber County Sheriff's Office on Friday afternoon, the Deputy Sheriff's Association unveiled a memorial in honor of fallen deputies.

Clark's name is the only one on the black stone memorial, and high-ranking members of the sheriff's office said at the unveiling that they hope their department never has to add another.

About 9 p.m. Nov. 27, 1908, Clark and another deputy went out on a trespassing call at a Uintah farm and arrested a vagrant.

They were on their way back to Ogden in a buggy when the deputies saw someone going into a boxcar on a rail siding. They stopped to investigate.

But a man in the boxcar opened fire on them with a .32-caliber automatic pistol. The other deputy and the vagrant were wounded, but 37-year-old Clark was hit four times and died a few minutes later.

Clark was buried in Ogden City Cemetery. His killer was never identified or caught, making Clark's death possibly one of the oldest known cold cases in the county, said Deputy Chad Allen, president of the sheriff's association.

Weber County Sheriff's Lt. Mark Lowther is a self-proclaimed history buff, particularly when it comes to Weber County, so when he heard about Clark and his story several years ago, he started the project to memorialize him.

"The worst thing we can do is forget someone who gave the ultimate sacrifice," Lowther said.

He and the association picked out a stone, and the Mark H. Bott Company held it until the association could raise enough funds to pay for it.

Meanwhile, Kameron Ebert, an Eagle Scout, made it his service project to landscape the front of the sheriff's office, where the memorial would go.

For his efforts and for the help of his troop, Thompson presented Kameron and Boy Scout Troop 45 with certificates at the unveiling.

Members of the Clark family were also on hand Friday afternoon.

Allen took a moment to recount Clark's life, to point out that families also make a sacrifice when their loved ones enter law enforcement.

When Clark died, he left behind his wife, Margaret. They had been married only a year.

She remained single, died 40 years later and was buried next to her husband.

Previous association boards and presidents had put off the memorial, but Allen said the time had come to see it through.

"It's time for us to properly pay respects," Thompson said.

Thompson honored Clark for his selfless example and his sacrifice.

"No man is worth his salt who is not ready at all times to risk his well-being, to risk his body, to risk his life, in a great cause," Thompson said, quoting former president and New York Police Commissioner Theodore Roosevelt, Clark's contemporary.

The sheriff encouraged all active officers to "stay safe, stay strong and stay positive."

The memorial unveiling concluded with a moment of silence, a rendition of Taps and a 21-gun salute.

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