Kaysville continues a tasty tradition

Sep 6 2012 - 8:35am

Images

NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Larry Hegland wipes down his 1940 Ford during the ninth annual Fall Cruise-In held Wednesday in Kaysville.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Trim details such as the hood ornament on this 1955 Chevrolet BelAir helped car fans tell the difference between models in America’s golden age of car design and manufacturing.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Larry Hegland wipes down his 1940 Ford during the ninth annual Fall Cruise-In held Wednesday in Kaysville.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Trim details such as the hood ornament on this 1955 Chevrolet BelAir helped car fans tell the difference between models in America’s golden age of car design and manufacturing.

KAYSVILLE -- Driving through downtown Kaysville on Wednesday evening had a different feel as nearly a hundred cars -- both new and old -- were on display in the parking lot around Pepperbelly's restaurant and the city library.

The atmosphere brought back good memories for Kevin White, of Kaysville. While looking at the nearly 80 cars on display, he came across an orange 1972 GMC truck, almost identical to the truck he learned to drive in.

"My first date was in that (truck), so it was very nostalgic to see again," White said

For his wife, Angela, meandering through the restored cars brought on a different type of nostalgia.

"You can't help but love our wonderful heritage we have in America," she said. "Seeing these cars is a reminder of our culture and the freedom we have to produce things like that."

The annual Cold Cones and Cool Cars event in downtown Kaysville has been a tradition for nine years. It was started by Kaysville residents Ed and Beverly Smith after they were inspired by the unique retro service station feel of Pepperbelly's restaurant.

"We were out to lunch one day at Pepperbelly's, with all the old-timey gas pumps and license plates, and everything just sang car show," Beverly Smith said.

They began working out the arrangements with the restaurant and Kaysville officials, who suggested they combine their event with longtime Kaysville resident Gordon Christensen, who has made a 25-year tradition of serving hundreds of ice cream cones to his neighbors.

The two classic activities have become a hit for the city as people peruse the cars while enjoying good old-fashioned ice cream.

"It's just a great tradition," said Jeff Dunford, who has been a member of the Kaysville civic committee, which helps organize the event. "Kaysville has some wonderful family-oriented traditions, and this one fits right in for the kids eating ice cream while their parents look at the cars."

Being a part of the tradition is exactly why Jerry Derrick, of Clinton, brought the 1932 Ford three-window deuce coupe he restored with his grandson, Michael Taylor, several years ago.

"My favorite part is enjoying the families and seeing the young kids -- that's what it's all about," said Derrick, who has been bringing his car to the event for the last seven years.

Holding the event downtown makes it even more special.

"A lot of car shows are in drive-ins and parks, but I don't know too many of them that are actually downtown with the old-town atmosphere," Ed Smith said.

The event has seen a dramatic increase in cars on display. Smith figures it might be a result of the good summer weather or "Maybe people have held off in the past with the economy, but this year said, 'Well, heck, we're just going for it.'"

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