‘I Love to See the Temple’: Family thrilled to be at cornerstone dedication

Oct 5 2012 - 6:52pm

Images

NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Six-year-old twins Kenden Hull (left) and MarleeAnn Hull, of Tremonton, wait for the cornerstone dedication ceremony to begin.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
The Brigham City Temple was dedicated on Sunday, Sept. 23.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Church officials look on as mortar is applied around the temple’s cornerstone. Three dedication ceremonies were held Sept. 23 and broadcast to church buildings around the area.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Boyd K. Packer, president of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, presides over the dedication of the Brigham City Temple’s cornerstone on Sunday, Sept. 23. Packer and his wife, Donna, were both born in Brigham City and met while attending Weber State University.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Six-year-old twins Kenden Hull (left) and MarleeAnn Hull, of Tremonton, wait for the cornerstone dedication ceremony to begin.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
The Brigham City Temple was dedicated on Sunday, Sept. 23.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Church officials look on as mortar is applied around the temple’s cornerstone. Three dedication ceremonies were held Sept. 23 and broadcast to church buildings around the area.
NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner
Boyd K. Packer, president of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, presides over the dedication of the Brigham City Temple’s cornerstone on Sunday, Sept. 23. Packer and his wife, Donna, were both born in Brigham City and met while attending Weber State University.

BRIGHAM CITY -- There was a certain bitter-sweetness felt by the Hull family, of Tremonton, when they attended a cornerstone dedication ceremony Sept. 23 on the grounds of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Brigham City Temple.

The bitter part was that 6-year-old twins MarleeAnn and Kenden would have to wait another of their lifetimes to enter the temple again now that the building was being dedicated.

Youths have to be 12 years old in order to do baptisms for the dead in the temple. Other ordinances are for adults.

The family had taken the 20-minute drive and been through the temple nine times in the weeks that the building was open for public tours.

"We got tickets the first day," said the mother, Laura Lee Hull.

And family members made new discoveries about the building every time they went.

"The twins would both try to find something new, so we saw something new every time," said the mother. "There were things that were at their level that my husband and I wouldn't have noticed."

But the sweet part was participating in the cornerstone dedication and having a chance to put some of the mortar around the cornerstone themselves.

"They didn't think they were going to be able to do anything because they are not 8, but they were able to come here," the mother said of the cornerstone dedication ceremony.

Children had to be at least 8 years old in order to participate in the dedication ceremonies that were held in the temple throughout the day and broadcast via satellite to ward and stake buildings throughout the area.

So the family decided the cornerstone dedication was the opportunity for the twins to participate.

Laura Lee Hull said she got up at 5 a.m. to be first in line at 6 a.m. at the gate of the temple. She saved a spot for her family members, who showed up just about a half hour before the

9 a.m. ceremony.

"They are really excited to get here and see President (Boyd K.) Packer (of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles) because they've never seen him except for on TV," Laura Lee Hull said.

But the children had participated in every other event associated with the building of the temple, starting with the groundbreaking.

Their dad, Marvin Hull, works in Ogden, and he would drive by the temple on his way as it was being built, to notice any new changes he could show the family.

"We have five or six photo albums full of pictures," Laura Lee Hull said.

But the father said the photo opportunity that came at the end of the cornerstone ceremony was the best of all of them.

It was when the children got a chance to put some of the mortar into the seam around the cornerstone themselves.

"This is the kind of memory you hope will last forever," Marvin Hull said. "As a dad, it is the most important thing that there is."

He said the family was surprised when the opportunity arose, because people in the crowd before the ceremony had rumored that they wouldn't have the chance to participate.

But when the twins got up to the front of the line, they were each offered tools and mortar at the same time.

"They were able to put them in together," said the father. "That was His plan."

Kenden said he was surprised to have the chance to add the mortar.

"I was glad I was a part to finish our temple," Kenden said. "It was so exciting to see the cornerstone finished."

Laura Lee Hull said the experience serves to cement the goals she and her husband have for themselves and their twins. She said:

"We want to think of it as ours, and we want them to think of it as theirs."

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