Davis High Key Club thanks special-needs students with a fiesta

May 9 2013 - 11:52am

Images

Kennedy Robb dances with Zach Rushton during a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville on Wednesday. (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Colton Todd Jones takes a swing at a piñata held by Michael Poole (left) at a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville on Wednesday. (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Tyler Johnson celebrates with Blake Curtis they broke open a pinata during a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville Wednesday, May 8, 2013. (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Hyatt Reinhold and Blake Curtis pose as a mariachi band member and a dancer during a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville Wednesday, May 8, 2013.  (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Tyler Johnson and other scramble for the treats after a pinata was broken during a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville Wednesday, May 8, 2013.  (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Hyatt Reinhold takes a swing at a piñata held by Michael Poole (left) at a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville on Wednesday. (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)(BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Kennedy Robb dances with Zach Rushton during a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville on Wednesday. (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Colton Todd Jones takes a swing at a piñata held by Michael Poole (left) at a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville on Wednesday. (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Tyler Johnson celebrates with Blake Curtis they broke open a pinata during a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville Wednesday, May 8, 2013. (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Hyatt Reinhold and Blake Curtis pose as a mariachi band member and a dancer during a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville Wednesday, May 8, 2013.  (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Tyler Johnson and other scramble for the treats after a pinata was broken during a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville Wednesday, May 8, 2013.  (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)
Hyatt Reinhold takes a swing at a piñata held by Michael Poole (left) at a Cinco de Mayo party hosted by Key Club members for the special-needs class at Davis High in Kaysville on Wednesday. (BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)(BRIAN NICHOLSON/Special to the Standard-Examiner)

KAYSVILLE -- One thing the Key Club at Davis High School is good at is serving others.

So it comes as no surprise the club was serving others again Wednesday by hosting a fiesta to thank special-needs students.

The event came complete with a pinata, tacos and mariachi band music.

The sophomores in the functional skills class spent the year helping the Key Club retrieve recycling materials throughout the school on a weekly basis.

"They are learning how to work; but for us it's a favor, because the recycling from all of the classrooms has become such a big thing that the bins needed to be emptied more often," said Key Club adviser Sharon Blair.

"Most of all, it gets them invested in their school, and they make friends while bettering their community," said another of the Key Club advisers, Debbie McDonald.

The students at Davis High School collect paper and cardboard, which is picked up by GreenFiber, a company that uses the recycled material to make insulation later sold to major home builders, contractors and home-improvement retail stores.

Functional skills teacher Amanda Marshall says the situation is a win-win for both sides. While Key Club benefits from her students' help, the students are receiving valuable work skills.

"One of our big focuses is becoming job-ready so they can be employed after high school, so this is important for them, because it helps them gain job skills," said Marshall.

For sophomore Hyatt Reinhold, one of the functional skills students, it's something he looks forward to every week.

"My favorite part is dumping the bins and getting the papers and staying focused on my job," Hyatt said.

Davis High School currently has 135 Key Club members. Key Club is the largest student-led service club in the world, Blair said. They do weekly service projects in addition to recycling, and just received $1,000 from Zero Fatalities of Utah for their work with the Don't Drive Stupid program, which entailed monthly activities and reminders for the students to make sure to avoid drunken or distracted driving.

Senior Amanda Smith has been a member of the Key Club for the last two years.

"Service is something we need, because it makes you a better person, and it's something fun," she said when asked why she enjoyed being a part of the club.

Senior Anthony Allen, also a member of the Key Club, pointed out that they don't have to work very hard to perform service.

"It just goes to show that we can help out the environment, all the while enjoying the company of our friends."

From Around the Web

  +