Children’s room at YCC named to honor Benedict sisters

May 17 2013 - 4:14pm

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Sisters Marilyn Mark (left), Stephanie Mongeon (center) and Iris Beckwith share a laugh after eating dinner together at Mount Benedict Monastery in South Ogden in 2004. (Standard-Examiner file photo)
Sisters Marilyn Mark (left), Stephanie Mongeon (center) and Iris Beckwith share a laugh after eating dinner together at Mount Benedict Monastery in South Ogden in 2004. (Standard-Examiner file photo)

OGDEN -- A new children's room at Your Community Connection will honor the Sisters of Mount Benedict Monastery when it is completed.

The announcement came last Saturday as the sisters were celebrated at an annual Rose Tea, which raises funds for YCC.

A plaque that will remain in the room to honor the sisters reads: "Let the little children come unto me and do not hinder them for the kingdom of Heaven belongs to such as these."

The quote is taken from the New International Version of Matthew 19:14.

The sisters have announced plans to leave the area to relocate to Minnesota by the end of the year.

"These sisters have done so much for so many. They are amazing," Julee Smith, YCC executive director, said in making the announcement. "Their legacy will live on in Ogden."

Smith said more than 300 children a year will be helped emotionally, socially and intellectually as YCC makes good use of the new children's room.

She also said an upcoming expansion of YCC is necessary.

"We turned away 86 victims of domestic violence last year," Smith said. "It makes us really sad."

In accepting the honor, Sister Danile Knight said she believes YCC represents well the principles the sisters have championed.

"We have seen them do wonderful things for women and children," Knight said. "We feel very good about leaving our legacy in their hands."

Sister Stephanie Mongeon reminded those in attendance that they had much for which to be grateful and invited them to allow gratitude into their lives.

Quoting Thomas Merton, Mongeon said: "To be grateful is to recognize the Love of God in everything He has given us -- and He has given us everything."

Merton, who was born in 1915 and died in 1968, was a Trappist monk of the Abbey of Gethsemani, Ky. He was a poet, social activist and student of comparative religion.

"The grateful person knows that God is good, not by hearsay but by experience," Mongeon said. "That is what makes all the difference."

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