Davis library’s Weinel Mill Stone monument rededicated

May 26 2013 - 10:26pm

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Contributed photo
Ann Marcusen. vice president of the Kaysville Davis/Kaysville Company of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, President Sharon Hadley and Kaysville Mayor Steve Hiatt stand near the Weinel Mill Stone monument at the Kaysville Branch of the Davis County Library.
Contributed photo
Ann Marcusen. vice president of the Kaysville Davis/Kaysville Company of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, President Sharon Hadley and Kaysville Mayor Steve Hiatt stand near the Weinel Mill Stone monument at the Kaysville Branch of the Davis County Library.

By RUTH MALAN

Standard-Examiner correspondent

KAYSVILLE -- The steady rain did not dampen the spirits of those gathered to rededicate the monument and refurbishing of the Weinel Mill Stone on Saturday. While several people with umbrellas gathered at the monument in front of the historic stone building that houses the Kaysville Branch of the Davis County Library, chairs were being set up in City Hall so the event could be moved inside.

The Weinel Mill was built in 1854. John Weinel, a native of Germany, came to Utah around 1853. He built the mill with an "overshot" water-powered system on Webb Creek about a quarter-mile northeast of where the monument stands. Native stones were used for the walls, and pines for its timbers. The mill was two stories high. Ox teams hauled the 2,200-pound flour-grinding stones to the site from a canyon near Bingham.

In 1947, one of the original millstones was saved and made into a monument by the Phillips Camp, Sunflower Camp and Oak Leaf Camp of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers.

Over the years, rain, wind and snow caused cracks to form and chunks of granite to loosen or fall from the millstone. The Davis Kaysville Company of DUP hired Keith McKay of Heritage Stone to repair the damaged millstone. He also sealed the stone and added a wide sleeve around the base to prevent further damage from the weather.

Because of Saturday's rain, city employees took a picture of the monument to show on a screen inside City Hall, where the dedication took place.

"We got the best stonemason in Utah to do the repairing," said Ann Marcusen, vice president of the Davis Kaysville Company of DUP. "It took over two years to resolve this problem."

Maurine Smith, president of the International Daughters of Utah Pioneers said, "This is the stuff we are all about. We need to make sure our children and grandchildren know the stories about things such as this. Don't let them forget they have such a rich heritage."

Smith explained that similar markers are all over the country and in Europe, honoring pioneers.

"If it wasn't for us, many memories would be lost," Smith said.

Marcusen encourages people to sit on the bench near the monument and read a book or just contemplate.

"Kaysville is a unique place. I can't imagine a more perfect place to live in Utah," said Mayor Steve Hiatt, who rededicated the monument.

He thanked the DUP for the work they do in preserving historical artifacts.

"This monument will stand forever in honor of those who stand before us," Hiatt said.

He dedicated it as a place for reflection, a place to contemplate and to meditate.

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