Last Zombie Prom held in Ogden before shuffling to SLC for good cause

Sep 7 2013 - 11:15pm

Images

(Clockwise from top left) Devon Crivello, Dusti Crowley, Ashlee Williams and Lindsay Walker attend Saturday night’s Zombie Prom at Union Station in downtown Ogden. The event, which benefits
 juvenile diabetes research, will be held in Salt Lake City next year. (DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examiner)
Zombie children Austin M. and Shelby T. look for brains at Ogden’s Union Station.  (DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examiner)
Zombie Prom co-founder Steve Strank airbrushes Annie Tuckett while Chloe Crumb watches Saturday before the benefit at Union Station. (DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examiner)
 Zombie Michael T. shuffles along the sidewalk in downtown Ogden. (DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examiner)
(Clockwise from top left) Devon Crivello, Dusti Crowley, Ashlee Williams and Lindsay Walker attend Saturday night’s Zombie Prom at Union Station in downtown Ogden. The event, which benefits
 juvenile diabetes research, will be held in Salt Lake City next year. (DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examiner)
Zombie children Austin M. and Shelby T. look for brains at Ogden’s Union Station.  (DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examiner)
Zombie Prom co-founder Steve Strank airbrushes Annie Tuckett while Chloe Crumb watches Saturday before the benefit at Union Station. (DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examiner)
 Zombie Michael T. shuffles along the sidewalk in downtown Ogden. (DYLAN BROWN/Standard-Examiner)

OGDEN -- The fifth annual Strankenstein's Zombie Prom invaded Union Station on Saturday night, marking the last year the event will be held in Ogden.

Salt Lake Comic Con organizers presented Steve and Trisha Strank, Zombie Prom founders, with an offer they couldn't refuse for next year: free rent.

"They realized they had extra days with a free building, so they said, 'Come down and use our building, it's not going to cost you anything,' " Steve Strank explained.

Trisha Strank said Zombie Prom raises an average of $4,000 a year for juvenile diabetes research. She is excited about the move to Salt Lake next year because free rent means more money for her charity.

This year's Zombie Prom featured performances by dancers from French Kiss Fitness, a magic show by the Magical Mysterious Mister James Dayley featuring staple gun Russian roulette, a raffle, live music by Jenny Shaw, and the chance to take zombie prom pictures.

Makeup artists were on hand to zombify attendees for a fee, and Steve Strank pulled triple duty as event organizer, zombie hunter and makeup guru.

Dayley shared his thoughts on why zombies are so appealing.

"Well, they're actually not very appealing, are they? They're kind of un-pealing and unraveling, so really I think that that's probably what it is -- I think it gives people a chance to get out of themselves," he said.

"That's why I'm really looking forward to Witchstock, because, that way, people get to get out of their faces and their bodies and they become something new, something else that's kind of cool."

Steve Strank said the popularity of the AMC TV show "The Walking Dead" has increased Zombie Prom attendance.

"The Walking Dead came out, and then it just went crazy. It kind of skyrocketed after that started."

Matthew Tafoya, 11, said he is a big fan of "The Walking Dead." When asked what he liked about zombies, he said, "They're awesome, and they can rip your head off and destroy it."

Lehi resident Levi Bradley, dressed as a zombie rodeo clown, had similar, though less gruesome, sentiments.

"What isn't there to like? It's something I've always been fascinated with since I was a kid, and now I can do it for real."

With sponsorship from Salt Lake Comic Con, Fear Factory and Spoox Bootique, and a larger venue for next year, the zombie horde that has supported Strankenstein's Zombie Prom and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation is expected to grow to apocalyptic levels of zombie infestation.

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