Dutch ovens, alcohol laws unique to Utah food scene

Sep 30 2013 - 3:42pm

Images

Photo courtesy Vickie Tracy
Bruce Tracy, of Ogden, demonstrates recipes from his “Dutch Oven Baking” cookbook while food writers, wearing cowboy hats, watch.
Photo courtesy Vickie Tracy
 This Impossible Zucchini Pie was cooked by Ross Conlin as part of the Association of Food Journalists’ Dutch oven day.
Photo courtesy Vickie Tracy
Bruce Tracy, of Ogden, demonstrates recipes from his “Dutch Oven Baking” cookbook while food writers, wearing cowboy hats, watch.
Photo courtesy Vickie Tracy
 This Impossible Zucchini Pie was cooked by Ross Conlin as part of the Association of Food Journalists’ Dutch oven day.

If you were inviting food writers from across the U.S. to visit Utah for three days, what would you show them? Where would you take them? What "uniquely Utah" foods would you feed them?

As co-chairwomen for the Association of Food Journalists' conference, those were some questions facing Kathy Stephenson, the Salt Lake Tribune's food editor, and me.

Every year, the AFJ -- a group of food editors, writers and cookbook authors -- has an annual conference in a host city, where they explore some of the regional cuisine and food culture. Some of my own favorite AFJ memories included meeting Emeril Lagasse in New Orleans, touring the Betty Crocker kitchens in Minneapolis, eating a pilgrim's Thanksgiving feast near Boston, and learning all about Kansas City barbecue.

So when Kathy agreed to host the 2013 conference in Park City -- and then asked for some help -- I felt pretty intimidated. Last year, the group toured the White House kitchen garden -- a pretty hard act to follow.

Two weeks ago, all of our plans came together at the Treasure Mountain Inn in Park City. Unfortunately, there were so many things we wanted to do that some of them just couldn't be packed into a three-day conference.

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