Volunteers make the garden grow

Oct 1 2013 - 4:40pm

Images

(Standard-Examiner file photo)
Volunteers with the LDS Church Harrisville Crops Welfare Project clean produce from the garden for distribution in July 2012. The fresh produce is handled only once, then placed in plastic totes and delivered by volunteers.
(Standard-Examiner file photo)
Volunteers with the LDS Church Harrisville Crops Welfare Project clean produce from the garden for distribution in July 2012. The fresh produce is handled only once, then placed in plastic totes and delivered by volunteers.

HARRISVILLE -- Probably more people pass within sight of this garden than practically any other in the Top of Utah.

The Harrisville Utah Crops welfare garden is wrapping up its third year. Its produce is earmarked for the Bishop's Storehouse in Ogden. This year, Elaine Andrushko, of Harrisville, has spent many hours volunteering at the garden.

She said a lot of produce is being grown: all kinds of squash, tomatoes and corn to name a few.

"It has gone well," with so many tomatoes they are now being sent to storehouses for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Layton and Brigham City and Catholic Community Services.

The garden covers just more than 2 acres and was started after the completion of the Harrisville Deseret Industries. Commuters on Wall Avenue can watch the workers and see the garden grow from seed in the spring to harvest in the fall. Leon Roche, the Harrisville Utah Crops assistant project manager, says 15 different vegetables grew in the garden this season.

"I love tomatoes best," said Roche, who grew up on a farm in Corinne. "There is nothing better than a fresh tomato. But they are all hard to grow if you don't take care of them or get moisture to them."

The garden has volunteers coming from 10 different stakes in the Ogden area. Paula Knighton coordinates the volunteer labor and Roche said the volunteers make all the difference.

"We would be dead in the water without the help," he said. "On days when we are picking, we need 15 to 20 people helping to get the vegetables in. We can't do it all."

Ron Fife, of North Ogden, works at the garden as a harvesting supervisor.

"There are a number of us who go over and help," he said. "Some of the volunteers have never been around farms or gardens before. We just offer a little help, so they pick the right size of vegetables and the right texture, so we get the best produce possible."

Fife appreciates the opportunity that the garden brings "to give back to the community, even though he said his legs aren't as strong as they used to be.

"I feel like it is important to help your community," he said. "It is the American thing to do, to serve and help others. It is hard work but worth it."

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