Missing Colorado skier found dead after avalanche

Tuesday , February 11, 2014 - 3:15 PM

The Associated Press

DILLON, Colo. — A skier missing after an avalanche outside a Colorado ski area was found dead Tuesday, about a day after he was swept up in a large slide.

The man, described as in his 40s and from the state’s populated Front Range area, is the 10th person to die in an avalanche nationally this season and the fourth since Sunday. The danger of more slides remained high after prolonged snowfall measured in feet that has lured skiers and snowboarders to the mountains.

The man was skiing with another person, who also was caught in Monday’s avalanche just outside Keystone Ski Resort but managed to pull himself out and go for help. Members of the Summit County Rescue Group searched for him Monday and again Tuesday, when a slab of snow that didn’t release with the rest of the original avalanche was triggered with explosives to make the area safer for searchers.

Another avalanche near Kebler (KEHB’-lur) Pass, outside Crested Butte, on Monday killed a snowmobiler, said Gunnison County coroner Frank Vader. Another person also was trapped in that slide but survived.

The death toll includes two people who died in slides in Utah over the weekend. On Sunday, Ashleigh Cox, 21, of Colorado Springs died after being caught in an avalanche while she was snowshoeing Saturday in American Fork Canyon. About 90 miles away in Utah’s Sanpete County, Clint Conover, 36, died after being buried in a slide Sunday while snowmobiling.

The Colorado Avalanche Information Center is warning against travel in parts of the backcountry after 2 to 4 feet of snow fell over the last several days. It’s putting pressure on the plentiful snow that was already on the ground and ensuring that any slides that do occur are very large, said Spencer Logan of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center.

“It definitely keeps us on the edge,” he said.

According to the center, the avalanches purposefully triggered by road crews to prevent surprise slides have been the largest in 20 years.



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