Centerville In-N-Out in high demand

Oct 15 2010 - 11:07pm

Images

ANTHONY SOUFFLE/Standard-Examiner
Audrey Brewster, 2, of Syracuse, chomps down on her lunch Friday at the newly opened In-N-Out Burger in Centerville. “I grew up in California,” says Brewster’s mother, Dena. “It was big when I was a teenager, so I told the kids, you have to see where I used to eat.”
ANTHONY SOUFFLE/Standard-Examiner 
Keith Stansfield, of Ogden, checks to make sure he’s getting the right order Friday at the new 
In-N-Out Burger in Centerville.
ANTHONY SOUFFLE/Standard-Examiner
Audrey Brewster, 2, of Syracuse, chomps down on her lunch Friday at the newly opened In-N-Out Burger in Centerville. “I grew up in California,” says Brewster’s mother, Dena. “It was big when I was a teenager, so I told the kids, you have to see where I used to eat.”
ANTHONY SOUFFLE/Standard-Examiner 
Keith Stansfield, of Ogden, checks to make sure he’s getting the right order Friday at the new 
In-N-Out Burger in Centerville.

CENTERVILLE -- After moving to the Top of Utah, former Los Angeles resident Osmin Mendoza missed the convenience of eating at In-N-Out Burger for lunch or dinner.

But on Friday, Mondoza's taste buds were reunited with the familiar menu of the popular California-based hamburger chain.

In-N-Out Burger in Centerville has opened its doors.

"This is the best burger," Mendoza said as he left the restaurant, giving the thumbs-up sign.

Mendoza, who now lives in Roy, said he lived in Los Angeles for 24 years before moving to Utah.

"I miss In-N-Out. My boy misses In-N-Out," he said.

And this weekend, Mendoza said, he hopes to return to the restaurant with his family so they can enjoy what he enjoyed Friday.

Mendoza was just one of a crowd of people, including what appeared to be a uniformed employee of the neighboring McDonald's, who visited In-N-Out Burger early Friday to avoid the noon lunch rush.

"I have driven by here 10 times (the past week) hoping they were open. I am glad they are open," said North Ogden resident Justin Anglesey, who happened to be working in the area.

In-N-Out officials braced for the crowd by placing orange traffic cones around the outer perimeter of its parking lot, which created a makeshift 50 vehicle-stack drive-up.

Centerville police also were on hand during peak times Friday to provide traffic control and to devise a way for additional traffic to stack along Frontage Road, the road accessing the business.

Centerville City Manager Steve Thacker said, based on conversations between police and In-N-Out officials, they are anticipating officers may be needed to manage traffic for a four- to six-week period.

"Until everybody has had their first one," Thacker said.

Based on discussions with police, Thacker said, In-N-Out Burger has agreed to reimburse the city for that expense.

"Every time we open a new restaurant, we come out prepared. We always want to anticipate that we're going to be busy," said Blande Pittman, division manager for In-N-Out Burger.

Pittman was one of many long-time employees on-hand to assist with the opening.

"What sets us apart is the quality of our product," said Mike Rodrigues, Centerville In-N-Out Burger restaurant manager.

To ensure prompt service from the onset, Rodrigues said, the restaurant, in addition to having a staff of 52 employees -- 45 of those local hires -- 50 trained employees from other restaurants in the chain will remain on-site for a few weeks to help out.

In-N-Out officials also have plans in the works to further expand into the Top of Utah, with talk of building restaurants in both Riverdale and Layton.

From Around the Web

  +