BASICS Sports Medicine adds CrossFit to its repertoire

May 20 2011 - 6:02am

Images

(NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner) Melanie Putnam works out with a medicine ball during a cross-training class at Swenson Gym on Thursday at Weber State University in Ogden.
(NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner) Zac Eldridge lifts weights during a cross-training class at the Swenson Gym.
(NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner) Melanie Putnam works out with a medicine ball during a cross-training class at Swenson Gym on Thursday at Weber State University in Ogden.
(NICK SHORT/Standard-Examiner) Zac Eldridge lifts weights during a cross-training class at the Swenson Gym.

OGDEN -- BASICS Sports Medicine, a sports rehabilitation program that works out of Weber State University, is adding something new.

BASICS -- which since 2004 has offered athletes speed and agility training, and physical and massage therapy -- is adding another specialty aimed at both professional athletes and the general public. The new element is CrossFit training, which offers workouts that can include basic weightlifting, sprinting, kettlebell and medicine-ball training, rowing, gymnastics and powerlifting.

The goal is an intense, variety-filled workout that builds stamina, flexibility, agility, coordination, balance and strength.

"It's a relatively new concept and an exciting partnership," said Melanie Pyle, a physical therapist and founder of BASICS.

In the past, BASICS was best known as a place for professional and student athletes to sharpen their game or work with therapists while recovering from injuries.

Pyle believes CrossFit training, to be provided by new partner Wasatch CrossFit, will draw in more of the general public.

"CrossFit is for everyone, especially beginners," she said. "CrossFit has got a reputation as a really rugged, aggressive, difficult training program. It is difficult, and it will test you, but our trainers are all educated to work with special populations. If you have joint issues, heart issues or certain medical issues, you would be trained at an intensity best for you. The same exercises can be adapted to everyone's needs."

CrossFit routines work a variety of muscle groups to build overall fitness.

Paul Putnam, BASICS spokesman, said CrossFit is one of the fastest-growing fitness businesses, with more than 3,000 affiliates worldwide. Wasatch CrossFit was the first Utah affiliate, Putnam said.

Myron Davis, a WSU professor of Health Promotion and Human Performance, hopes the BASICS and CrossFit experts can learn from each other.

"CrossFit has captured the attention of a lot of people," Davis said. "The workout can be intense and random in nature, and what we hope to do is bring more science to that, and harness the momentum CrossFit has, and direct it in a constructive and effective manner.

"What I'm trying to do, working with BASICS and Damon Stewart (Wasatch CrossFit owner) is to work with all our professionals in developing a sequenced, progression-oriented program.

"It really has a lot of potential. I'm kind of excited."

For more information on BASICS, call 801-626-8933 or visit www.basicsutah.com.

From Around the Web

  +