High-schoolers build house for Layton family

Jun 1 2011 - 3:05pm

Images

(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) A new house was built by high school students at Layton High School students, shown here at its unveiling Thursday.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) The Noble family, Blake Noble and his wife Megan and their four children attend Thursday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony for a house built by high school students in Layton. The Nobles are in the process of buying the home.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) People mingle inside the living room before Thursday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony for a house built by high school students.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) A new house was built by high school students at Layton High School students, shown here at its unveiling Thursday.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) The Noble family, Blake Noble and his wife Megan and their four children attend Thursday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony for a house built by high school students in Layton. The Nobles are in the process of buying the home.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) People mingle inside the living room before Thursday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony for a house built by high school students.

LAYTON -- Blake Noble's commute to work will soon be cut from 25 minutes to just one.

In June, Noble, a Layton police officer, and his family will move from Ogden into their new Layton home, which was built by students at Layton High School as part of a program with the Davis School District.

On Thursday, the Nobles were joined by officials from Layton and Davis School District, as well as the teacher and students who built the house, for a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate another completed home.

"It's a beautiful home, and we're really excited to be moving here," Noble said. "We're sad to leave where we live because of the friends we made there, but we're excited to make new friends here and for the new adventure."

As part of the program, students at Syracuse High School also built a home in West Point, and Davis High School students built a house in Kaysville. But the one in Layton is unique.

For the third straight year, Layton used money from its Community Development Block Grant to buy the house and then sold it to a deserving family at a lower price. The other two homes will be sold at market value.

Ben Hart, Layton's economic development specialist, said there were four applicants for the house, but something special about the Nobles stood out.

"This is a great family, and we're honored to have them here," Hart said.

The 1,500-square-foot rambler with a three-car garage and an unfinished basement on Golden Ave., will be home to Blake and his wife, Megan, and their four children.

"The children have already gone through the house and picked out their bedrooms," Megan said.

The Nobles' soon-to-be next-door-neighbor, Alex Davis, also is a Layton police officer. Davis and his family were chosen by the city to purchase last year's house built by the high school students.

"This is going to be the best-patrolled street in the city," said Layton Mayor Steve Curtis.

Jeff Kidder, in his fourth year as a carpentry teacher at Layton High School, oversaw the building of the house. Kidder was the first to purchase a home on Golden Avenue built by Layton High students, and he is looking forward to his new neighbors.

"I think it's great to have people serving in the community live in the community," Kidder said.

The street may have been the best-patrolled even before the Nobles' application was selected. While the house was being built, even before he knew he and his family would be living there, Noble often drove by to check the progress.

Then, after his family knew they were getting the house, Noble was walking through the completed house with his family when a teenager sped by.

"Blake jumped in his car and went and got him," Megan said.

Several of the students who worked on the house stood proudly by, and others looked around before the ribbon-cutting ceremony. For the students, who started on the house in August and finished in May, the house will serve as a tribute to their hard work.

Student Corbyn Taurone said, "It was a lot better than book work and in-school work."

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