Dolly Levi matches up young lovers in Bonneville musical

Oct 28 2010 - 7:01pm

Images

Karson Boothe as Irene and Harley Knudson as Minnie in “Hello, Dolly!” at Bonneville High School in Washington Terrace.
Jared Waite as Cornelius and Chad Dingham as Barnaby in “Hello, Dolly!”
Karson Boothe as Irene and Harley Knudson as Minnie in “Hello, Dolly!” at Bonneville High School in Washington Terrace.
Jared Waite as Cornelius and Chad Dingham as Barnaby in “Hello, Dolly!”

If your sorrowful tears have dried from last season's Bonneville High School production of "Les Miserables," it's safe to go back to the theater.

The fall show this year is the upbeat musical "Hello, Dolly!"

"We thought it was time for a comedy so chose the classic comedy 'Hello Dolly,' the exact opposite of 'Les Miserables,'aaaa" said drama teacher Alane Schofield Schultz in an e-mail. "My very favorite thing about the show is the music, it is uplifting, funny and delightful. I leave rehearsal happy each night."

"Hello, Dolly!" is a musical version of the Thornton Wilder farce "The Matchmaker." It tells the story of matchmaker Dolly Levi and her scheme to win the heart of rich widower Horace Vandergelder.

"We produced 'Noises Off' years ago. I've often compared this to 'Noises Off' to music," Schultz wrote.

The show allows for a large cast of eager young actors, making it a good choice for a high school production. The set and costume requirements may be lavish, but Bonneville High School can handle that.

The set was designed by South Ogden freelancer Robert Vaughan and constructed by the students. "It is unique, fully reimagined, not copied from the original Broadway set," said Schultz.

Last year's "Les Miz" set, also designed by Vaughan, was sold to Woods Cross High School, and Schultz hopes to sell this year's set to a high school as well.

"The students love to see their work get passed on," she said.

In some ways, "Hello, Dolly!" is more challenging than "Les Miserables," Schultz said.

"The main challenge for me as a director is to get the timing of the comedy," Schultz wrote. "People often assume it's easier to do comedy than drama because drama relies on such deep emotion, but in reality, comedy is 10 times as hard. Good comedic timing is a gift."

From Around the Web

  +