Creating sparks in children's minds about outdoor activities

Mar 11 2010 - 1:30pm

Images

Mckenna Hyer (left) watches Mary Haas use her flint to send sparks flying into a pile of tinder at a 4-H Club event.
Josh Kelley, Gabriel Romero, SSgt Dan Nelson, Ethan Brown and Kamari Fuller gather round to watch Nelson start a fire.
Nathan Walker works on digging a pit for his fire during the 4-H Club visit to Wetland Discovery Point in Kaysville.
Mckenna Hyer (left) watches Mary Haas use her flint to send sparks flying into a pile of tinder at a 4-H Club event.
Josh Kelley, Gabriel Romero, SSgt Dan Nelson, Ethan Brown and Kamari Fuller gather round to watch Nelson start a fire.
Nathan Walker works on digging a pit for his fire during the 4-H Club visit to Wetland Discovery Point in Kaysville.

Flames lit up the excitement in children's eyes as members of the Military 4-H Outdoor Recreation Club, a part of the Youth Programs on base, learned how to create fire using flint and tinder Feb. 27.

The club's first activity was held at Wetland Discovery Point in Kaysville as children learned basic survival skills for the outdoors and played a game where they pretended to be stranded on an island.

"We talked about what the human body needs to survive. Air, water, food, shelter, warmth, stuff like that," said April Danyluk, the Military 4-H Club coordinator.

Afterward, kids huddled around Outdoor Rec Club leaders Tech. Sgt. Jeff Reed, Staff Sgt. Erick Blevins and Staff Sgt. Dan Nelson, all of the 573rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, and watched the sparks fly.

"They definitely liked building the fires," Danyluk added.

Though the weather limits some of the activities the Outdoor Rec Club can do right now, they have big plans for the summer.

"We're planning more hikes and camping trips," Danyluk said. She also mentioned that the leaders were hoping to take some of the older children on an overnight camping trip.

"We're going to do a lot of shooting sports," Danyluk added when asked about upcoming activities. "We'll use the range here on base."

For now, the leaders are working on signing their members up for hunter education courses.

"(The class) gives them a really good background and training for using guns and (gun) safety," Danyluk said. "We're encouraging them all to take it."

Aside from providing a chance for children to connect with the outdoors, the Military 4-H Club also offers them a chance to learn and have fun. "(The parents) were really grateful just to have an outlet like this," Danyluk said.

"What's cool about 4-H I think is it's largely based on what the students' interest is," she added.

If you're interested in joining the Military 4-H Club or want to find out more, please contact April Danyluk at (801) 451-3414 or april.danyluk@usu.edu.

The annual membership fee for the 4-H Club is $5 and there is no limit to the number of 4-H clubs a child can join. If children are signed up as members of the Youth Center on base, they are already 4-H Club members and don't need to pay the annual fee.

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