Descendants hail Mountain Meadows landmark status

Jul 1 2011 - 3:38pm

Images

FILE -  In this July 17, 2002 file photo, a marker describes the Mountain Meadows burial site which is in the valley, at rear, in Mountain Meadows, Utah. This southern Utah site where Mormons massacred members of a 19th Century Arkansas wagon train has been designated a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Interior Department.    (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac, File)
FILE -  In this July 17, 2002 file photo, a marker describes the Mountain Meadows burial site which is in the valley, at rear, in Mountain Meadows, Utah. This southern Utah site where Mormons massacred members of a 19th Century Arkansas wagon train has been designated a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Interior Department.    (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac, File)

ST. GEORGE -- Descendants of massacre victims at a southern Utah site say the elevation of the Mountain Meadows area to national landmark status is more than just a cause for celebration -- it's a moment of healing.

The 760-acre site marks the spot where 120 members of an Arkansas wagon train were shot and killed on Sept. 11, 1857 by a Mormon militia.

It was elevated to a National Historic Landmark on Thursday by the U.S. Interior Department.

Descendants of the Baker-Fancher wagon train have fought for years to memorialize their ancestors and to wrestle an apology from leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Those words have not come.

But descendants say the church's efforts to lead the push for landmark status helps heal decades of hurt.

 

From Around the Web

  +