Hearing about the Ten Commandments at different venues, churches in Ogden brings Scouts a feeling of community

Apr 22 2011 - 5:27pm

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(ANTHONY SOUFFLE/Standard-Examiner) Father Kenneth Vialpando takes a question from a Boy Scot as he teaches them about the third commandment, “Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain.”
(ANTHONY SOUFFLE/Standard-Examiner) Herschel Hester, of Fruit Heights, waits for a group of about 100 Boy Scouts on last Saturday at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Ogden.
(ANTHONY SOUFFLE/Standard-Examiner) Father Kenneth Vialpando takes a question from a Boy Scot as he teaches them about the third commandment, “Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain.”
(ANTHONY SOUFFLE/Standard-Examiner) Herschel Hester, of Fruit Heights, waits for a group of about 100 Boy Scouts on last Saturday at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Ogden.

OGDEN -- It is possible for different religions to come together with one message.

That was the point last Saturday, when 80 Boy Scouts and their leaders hiked around downtown Ogden to seven area churches and held other discussions at city parks.

At each spot, they learned about a different Commandment.

Organizers hope to make the Ten Commandment Hike an annual event for area Scouts.

And participants said they enjoyed the activity.

"It was fun to learn about what other churches believe," said Trent Jorgensen, 14, a Hooper resident and member of Troop 183.

But Trent said he was surprised about something he discovered.

"I saw how similar all the religions are," he said.

Cody Roberts, 16, an Ogden resident who is a member of the special-needs Boy Scouts said he felt different about keeping the Commandments after hearing the presentations.

His dad, Keith "Sam" Roberts said: "I liked how different the (various churches) are, and they are almost the same."

Such lessons were exactly what organizers were hoping to achieve.

"When we asked the boys why we are here today, none of them mentioned advancement," said Michael Jenkins, district director of the Trapper Trails Council of the Boy Scouts of America. "They said learning about community and all the good reasons."

Scouts and leaders came from six different districts of the 18 in the council.

The event was open to any troop from the Ogden area. Those who came were from Syracuse, Roy, Clinton, South Ogden, South Weber and Ogden.

Jenkins said the event likely will be held at the same time every year because of the significance early May plays in many religious traditions.

A patch designed for the event doesn't have a date or a location, so the Boy Scout council can take the event to other areas in its borders, including Logan and Wyoming.

At one stop, the Boy Scouts heard from Sabrina Stillwell, a member of the First Church of Christ, Scientist.

Stillwell talked about how many of the Commandments start with the phrase "Thou shalt not."

She said she believes that what God meant to say is that if people understood how to follow and worship, God is telling them they wouldn't even want to do anything contrary to these teachings.

Stillwell's presentation was on stealing.

She broadened her definition of stealing to include use of anything that is not one's own, including using credit to purchase items because that is money that one does not have.

Stillwell said that stealing hurts the one who steals, as well as those they steal from.

"It doesn't bless the one unless it blesses everyone involved," Stillwell said, quoting Mary Baker Eddy, founder of her faith.

Another presenter was Pastor Neal Humphrey, of Westminster Presbyterian Church in Fruit Heights.

Humphrey's Commandment was "Thou shalt not kill."

Humphrey said the Commandment was meant to go beyond killing to include refraining from violence as well.

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