7,000 attend Safe Kids Day fair at Weber County Fairgrounds

Apr 24 2010 - 10:45pm

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(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) Children and parents listen to Roy City Fireman Greg Parrish demonstrate what a smoke detector sounds like at Child Safety Day, which is sponsored by the Ogden Police Department at the Weber County Fairgrounds in Ogden on Saturday.
(NICHOLAS DRANEY/Standard-Examiner) Children and parents listen to Roy City Fireman Greg Parrish demonstrate what a smoke detector sounds like at Child Safety Day, which is sponsored by the Ogden Police Department at the Weber County Fairgrounds in Ogden on Saturday.

OGDEN -- If 5-year-old Evan Johnson hears the smoke alarm in her house, she'll know what do to.

"When a fire alarm goes off, it's a practice. We learned how to do that. We go outside. If all the kids are there, we put the card on red. If there are missing kids, we put the card on green," she said.

Johnson learned about this and more at a Safe Kids Day fair at the Weber County Fairgrounds Saturday.

Jann Fawcett, injury prevention specialist with the Weber-Morgan Health Department, plans a Safe Kids Day event each year with the Safe Kids and Safe Communities coalition. They had such a strong response with the last 10 events held at local businesses that they expanded the event at the fairgrounds this year. She estimates more than 7,000 people came.

"It's beyond a success. There were huge lines way early. We gave away 500 helmets. Being healthy correlates with being safe and it's all about keeping kids and families safe. It's been a great event. We're really excited," she said.

Most of the vendors had information, games and activities related to injury prevention, but Fawcett said the coalition included emergency preparedness information and craft vendors for variety and entertainment, bouncy slides and a petting zoo for fun.

Kausha LeBeau, 12, of Sugarhouse, came to the fair not to learn about safety, but to teach it.

As a volunteer with Hope of America, LeBeau manned the Primary Children's Hospital booth measuring children and letting their parents know that, if they are shorter than 4 feet 9 inches tall and not riding in a booster seat, they could be seriously injured in a car accident.

Andy Ostler of Emergency Medical Services for Children said car safety is a concern for teenagers as well.

"Our whole purpose is to talk about buckling up for teenagers, especially teenagers in rural areas driving pickup trucks without a seat belt. They have a great opportunity to be injured fatally," he said.

Several activities focused on bicycle safety. In one area children learned about road signs and practiced their skills on a bike course. At another station, they decorated bicycle helmets.

"Wear a helmet when you ride bikes or you would crack your head," said 8-year-old Shelby Wilson, of Ogden, after decorating her helmet.

Morgan Jones, 5, of Salt Lake City, learned about fire safety.

"Always crawl through smoke," he said, "It doesn't go underground. Do not touch pans. They can burn you."

Fawcett said these lessons can save lives.

"We need to reduce injuries and fatalities," she said, "for kids, adults, everyone."

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