A sticky situation in Bountiful / Families make items using library books, duct tape

Sep 24 2010 - 11:14pm

Images

(MICHAEL FRIBERG/Standard-Examiner) Duct tape is used to create a cell phone case Thursday at the library in Bountiful.
(MICHAEL FRIBERG/Standard-Examiner) Bryson Barker, 9, makes a duct tape belt at the library in Bountiful on Thursday.
(MICHAEL FRIBERG/Standard-Examiner) Librarian Janice Whatcott (left) helps Kylynn Randall make a duct tape wallet at the library in Bountiful on Thursday.
(MICHAEL FRIBERG/Standard-Examiner) Duct tape is used to create a cell phone case Thursday at the library in Bountiful.
(MICHAEL FRIBERG/Standard-Examiner) Bryson Barker, 9, makes a duct tape belt at the library in Bountiful on Thursday.
(MICHAEL FRIBERG/Standard-Examiner) Librarian Janice Whatcott (left) helps Kylynn Randall make a duct tape wallet at the library in Bountiful on Thursday.

BOUNTIFUL -- The sticky, flexible, water-resistant product commonly known as duct tape has come a long way from its original use during World War II for sealing ammunition cases and repairing military equipment in a pinch.

Duct tape is now used to make wallets, ties, purses and cell phone cases, as evidenced Thursday by the crowd of children, teenagers and their parents huddled around tables in the basement of the Davis County South Branch Library in Bountiful.

Even better, the kids made their creations by reading instructions from actual library books on how to make things using duct tape.

The Davis County Library system offers numerous programs throughout the year that specifically encourage kids to keep reading. However, it's not too common for the librarians to see a group of boys gathering at the library.

"The last time I did this, I had a table full of sixth- to ninth-grade boys making wallets," said Laurel Pederson, youth services coordinator for the library. "It was hilarious. I'm very OK if boys are willing to sit in the library making duct tape wallets."

Put on two or three times per year, the duct tape extravaganza is one of the more popular programs staged by the library.

"We take every opportunity to introduce books to these kids, especially programs like this because it is a hands-on, fun-family activity," Pederson said.

"We will have moms and dads show up with three or four teenagers, sit there as a group and do these projects and have a lot of fun together."

Such was the case for Raine Elliott, of Farmington, who was there making duct tape ties with his 15-year-old son William Anderson.

William planned to wear his tie the next day at school, while his dad was making one for work.

"I'm a disc jockey, so my new tie will be very fashionable," Elliott said.

The library has seen a number of duct tape wardrobes, including a group of teenagers who walked out with entirely new outfits made out of the multicolored tape.

Duct tape is used by some teens to compete for the most stylish prom formalwear as part of an annual college scholarship competition sponsored by the tape's manufacturers.

The options are endless, especially for Katie Day, a 12-year-old from Bountiful, who has turned into a duct tape guru.

It all started when she received a ductigami kit -- basically an origami kit using duct tape -- for Christmas two years ago.

"I thought it looked really cool, though it was kind of tricky at first and hard to get it to stick right," Katie said.

"It took me a couple of tries to get things right, but now I even make up my own stuff. You really can make anything with it and be creative."

On Thursday, Katie sported a spotted hat and a vest and carried a flower and dragon, all made out of the sticky stuff.

From Around the Web

  +