14-mile Legacy Parkway trail maintenance OK'd

Apr 10 2011 - 10:18pm

Images

KRISTIN HEINICHEN/Standard-Examiner 
Bransen Nelson (center) rides with his parents, Bill and Sonya Nelson, and sister, Alexa Nelson, at Birnam Woods Trailhead where road closed signs are posted because of a leaking bridge in Farmington recently.
KRISTIN HEINICHEN/Standard-Examiner 
Bransen Nelson (center) rides with his parents, Bill and Sonya Nelson, and sister, Alexa Nelson, at Birnam Woods Trailhead where road closed signs are posted because of a leaking bridge in Farmington recently.

FARMINGTON -- Stroller-pushing moms and bicycle commuters who use the 14-mile Legacy Parkway trail system should have fewer obstacles in the near future.

Utah Department of Transportation has reached a collective trail maintenance agreement with Davis County and four Davis cities that has each entity agreeing to take responsibility for maintaining the section of trail that runs through its jurisdiction.

UDOT spokesman Vic Saunders said the state maintained the trail for more than a year, but the 12-month warranty period the department included on its trail construction ended in November 2009.

As a result, the trail has gone without maintenance since then.

Although only a small section of the north-south trail following the Legacy Parkway route from Farmington to North Salt Lake is in the unincorporated county, the county is coordinating the effort in bringing all parties to the table.

Cities participating with the county in the agreement are Farmington, Centerville and Woods Cross, said Barry Burton, Davis County director of planning.

A more detailed contract between the county and the cities as to how they will participate in caring for the trail is forthcoming, said Woods Cross City Manager Gary Uresk.

"This agreement basically says each city will be responsible for maintaining the portion of the trail in their jurisdiction," he said. "The next step is for us to figure out how to do that as efficiently as possible."

Uresk said the group may seek a third party to take care of the entire trail, then the cities would each pay their portion.

Burton said the Davis County Public Works Department possibly could handle maintenance of the trail.

The two south Davis County cities missing from the agreement are West Bountiful and North Salt Lake, which is in the process of working out other issues with UDOT before signing onto the maintenance agreement, Burton said.

County Commissioner Bret Millburn said the maintenance agreement provides long-term viability for the trail, which receives heavy use on a daily basis.

"It is getting a tremendous amount of use. From commuters to moms with strollers," Burton conceded.

County Commissioner John Petroff Jr. said he has seen entire families riding bikes along the trail, which offers a safe riding environment for bicyclist and pedestrians.

A road in Centerville is the only east-west cross street that intersects the 14-mile Legacy Parkway trail, Burton said.

The Legacy Parkway trail on its south end connects to the Jordan River Parkway, which is expected to be completed this summer, Burton said, and will allow users of the Legacy Parkway trail to access North Temple in Salt Lake City.

By the end of the summer, users of the Denver & Rio Grande rail trail to the Farmington Creek trail, which runs east to west, will be able to connect into the Legacy Parkway trail, Burton said. That will give users the ability to go from Roy in Weber County to North Temple in Salt Lake City on a class 1 trail.

"Great amenity," Petroff Jr. said of the trail system.

Uresk said the trail will gain even more users once future connections are made.

"There are a lot of people who use the trail," he said. "And believe it or not, there are a lot of people who use it to commute by bicycle. You'll see a lot more usage in the future."

The interlocal agreement states the cities will take care of the trail's trash, signs, trailheads, weeds, snow, graffiti and surface maintenance, including all asphalt, road base and wood boardwalks.

UDOT will be responsible for the structural integrity of overpasses along the trail, gateway monuments and most of the trail's lighting.

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