• 3 arrested after car crash and suspected burglary

    LOGAN CANYON — Cache County sheriff’s deputies responding to a reported shooting ended up arresting on suspicion of burglary the three teens who made the 911 call. Deputies went to Temple Fork in Logan Canyon early Friday after the juveniles reported crashing their vehicle in an attempt to escape being shot by a camper.  The camper, a rancher in the area, told police he caught the juveniles in his campsite about 4:30 a.m. He fired one round into the ground after yelling at the juveniles, the sheriff’s office said in a press release.  The juveniles’ vehicle crashed less than a mile from the campsite. They then walked down Logan Canyon and called 911.  The SWAT team was called in due to the report of firearms use. SWAT attempted to make contact with the rancher using bull horns and eventually a distraction device. The rancher wasn’t home at the time, and came back to the SWAT team surrounding his house. He was detained for questioning and later released.  Josh Haag, 18, was arrested. He was booked in the Cache County Jail on initial charges of obstructing justice, burglary of a vehicle and contributing to the delinquency of a minor, all misdemeanors. The two others involved were referred to juvenile court on similar charges. The investigation is ongoing. [gmap=41.831466, -111.585374] Contact reporter Raychel Johnson at 801-625-4279 or rajohnson@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter @raychelNEWS.

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  • Top 5 Headlines to Know. Now.

    Here are the top 5 stories to Know. Now. for Friday, July 31, 2015.  1. Funeral donations for toddler's family up to $12,000.  Read story here.  2. North Ogden looking to rid property blights.  Read story here.  3. Twin Falls murder victim to be buried in Ogden.  Read story here.  4. Man stabs several people at Jerusalem gay pride parade.  Read story here.  5. A vengeful Internet goes after dentist who shot Cecil the lion.  Read story here. 

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  • 13 guns seized from man who wanted police shootout

    SOUTH OGDEN -- Police arrested a man they believe shot an assault rifle in his driveway to lure officers to him. The officers later seized more than a dozen guns the man was not allowed to possess. Michael Hohosh, 32, was booked into the Weber County Jail on 13 counts of possession of a dangerous weapon by a restricted person, possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. On July 21, South Ogden Police responded to 825 E. 38th Street on reports of shots fired, according to an arrest report. Officers did not initially find anything and cleared the scene. A second call also came in hours later. [gmap=41.193802, -111.959886] On Thursday, officers were called to the same address for a welfare check after it appeared that the resident’s vehicle’s windows had been shot out, according to the report. Officers made contact with Hohosh who admitted to firing an AR-15 assault rifle in his driveway. Bullet casings were found along the driveway. The suspect gave consent to officers to search his home, where they found the AR-15 and 12 other firearms including assault rifles, handguns and a shotgun, according to the report. Three knives were also found. Hohosh told police he had been smoking marijuana. Police found 6.62 grams, along with a glass pipe, in the home. According to the arrest report, as Hohosh was being booked into jail he commented, “I have been shooting at my house for weeks and you guys never came and got me. Can I talk with a bondsman right now so I can get out?” Police said they asked Hohosh if he wanted to get in a shootout with officers. Hohosh replied, he wanted to either go to jail or die in a shootout. Hohosh was deemed a danger to himself and the community and is being held without bail. Contact reporter Andreas Rivera at 801-625-4227 or arivera@standard.net. Follow him on Twitter at @SE_Andreas.  

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  • Prison inmates start hunger strike to demand release of gang leaders

    Forty two inmates at the Utah State Prison began a hunger strike Friday morning to demand the release of gang leaders, according to a statement released by the Utah Department of Corrections. The inmates are all documented gang members held in maximum security at the Uinta Facility of the prison. Upon refusing their breakfasts, the inmates gave prison staff notice of the strike and a list of demands, including the release of gang leaders housed elsewhere in maximum security. According to the statement, the Department of Corrections will continue to offer the inmates meals as regularly scheduled and will also offer health evaluations. It also has taken inventory of each inmate’s food items to “document potential nutritional intake.” Contact reporter Taylor Hintz at 801-625-4221 or thintz@standard.net. Follow on Twitter @TaylorHintz.

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  • Man arrested for shooting assault rifle in driveway

    SOUTH OGDEN -- Police arrested a man they believe shot an assault rifle in his driveway to lure officers to him. The officers later seized more than a dozen guns in the man’s possession. Michael Hohosh, 32, was booked into the Weber County Jail on Thursday after being released from McKay-Dee Hospital. He is charged with 13 counts of possession of a firearm by a restricted person, 3 counts of possession of dangerous weapon by a restricted person, possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. On July 21, South Ogden Police responded to 825 E. 38th Street on reports of shots fired, according to an arrest report. Officers did not initially find anything and cleared the scene. Officers were called to the same address for a welfare check a few hours later after a neighbor reported that the resident’s vehicle’s windows had been shot out, according to the report. Officers made contact with Hohosh who admitted to firing an AR-15 assault rifle in his driveway. Bullet casings were found along the driveway. The suspect gave consent to officers to search his home, where they found the AR-15 and 12 other firearms including assault rifles, handguns and a shotgun, according to the report. Three knives were also found. [gmap=41.193802, -111.959886] Hohosh told police he had been smoking marijuana. Police found 6.62 grams, along with a glass pipe, in the home. According to the arrest report, as Hohosh was being booked into jail he commented, “I have been shooting at my house for weeks and you guys never came and got me. Can I talk with a bondsman right now so I can get out?” Police said they asked Hohosh if he wanted to get in a shootout with officers. Hohosh replied, he wanted to either go to jail or die in a shootout, according to the report. Silvia Hohosh, Michael Hohosh’s mother, told the Standard-Examiner he was checked into McKay-Dee Hospital, about a week before being booked into jail, due to mental distress. The incident was a cry for help and her son did not mean anyone harm, she said. He was cooperative with police in their investigation and arrest. Hohosh is a gunsmith, which is the reason he had so many firearms in his home, she said. The jail deemed Hohosh a danger to himself and the community and is being held without bail as he awaits arraignment. Contact reporter Andreas Rivera at 801-625-4227 or arivera@standard.net. Follow him on Twitter at @SE_Andreas.

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  • Centerville's police chief ready for retirement

    CENTERVILLE -- Serving the community he grew up in has been the “best job in the world,” said Centerville’s police chief. Chief Neal Worsley began his police career as a Centerville reserve patrol officer in 1983 when he was 27 years old. He was hired by the city’s first police chief, Cliff Russell, to be part of the seven officer department . Worsley was given a box that had all the equipment he needed. He was told to pick out an old used uniform and was given the keys to an old Pontiac car that had simply a four-channel radio and a PA system. He relied on the Davis County dispatchers to run names and license plate numbers for him. “Dinosaurs like me need to go,” he said.   Now, Worsley, who is the city’s third police chief, plans to retire on Friday, Aug. 7. He was named Centerville’s police chief in 2002. He will turn over the department’s reins to Assistant Police Chief Paul Child, who has been with department for 28 years. The department now has 18 officers.  “31 years is a long time for any career,” Worsley said.  Centerville City is hosting a retirement open house for Worsley, which the public can attend, on Friday from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the City Hall, 250 N. Main St.  [gmap=40.919749, -111.878576] Worsley knows he’s unique in a mobile world where people take jobs in communities far from their childhood home. He grew up in Centerville and said he had his share of run-ins with police officers as a teenager. “My friends and me liked to go out and have a good time,” he said laughing.   Worsley made his home just five blocks from the police station, raising two sons in the town he grew up in.  Being a police officer with a family meant that events like birthday parties, dinners and Christmas would be missed.  One Christmas Eve, Worsley got called out at 9:30 p.m. because of two brothers who had been setting off explosives in the overflow canal of the Deuel Reservoir. His sons were 8 and 5 years old at the time. Worsley took the older son with him. “He was tired of me being called out all the time and asked if he could go,” he said. The pair returned home at 3 a.m. and found the younger son had decided to have Christmas without the family. “He had the big screen TV on, found all his presents and opened them,” Worsley said.    Worsley has watched his childhood town grow from one grocery store to five box stores, as well as a theater and strip malls.  And crime has also changed.  Back when he was a patrol officer, then later a detective, the crimes were residential burglaries with some theft and credit card fraud thrown in.  Now, “everything is much more complex,” including the technology,  Worsley said. But the key to solve crimes does not require the newest technology gadget, Worsley said. “No matter how much technology you have, you still have to get off your fanny and go out on the street, knock on doors and talk to people,” Worsley said. Working as a police officer meant every day brought new challenges, he said. But some of those days are days he wishes he could simply forget. “I wish we could hit the ’control/alt/delete’ and erase those memories,” he said. One case involved a chase out of Salt Lake County that came into Davis County along Interstate 15. Officers tried to set up a rolling roadblock to stop the vehicle before it got to Farmington. The driver of the vehicle lost control of the vehicle, sending it into the median then into oncoming traffic, he said. “Then it crashed and it blew up,” Worsley said. “There were two individuals inside.” Worsley said officers used up all of their fire extinguishers, but were unable to save the two people inside. “It’s such a helpless feeling seeing them, the flames and know there is nothing you can do,” he said.  Worsley also wishes he could forget the three children and their father who died in a house fire that was started by a cigarette smoldering in a couch.  “That was the worst call,” he said. He was called to the scene because officials needed someone to identify the man.  “I knew the father,” Worsley said.  The three children died of smoke inhalation, he said.  But one event, even though it was a challenge, kept his faith in his community. The wind storm of Dec. 1, 2011, Worsley said he was called out of his home at 4:30 a.m. Wind gusts reached more than 100 mph and lasted all night and into the next day in Davis County. The winds hit Centerville extra hard.  “The damage was horrendous,” Worsley said.  Most of the city was without power. Trees and fences had been blown over like matchsticks. Roofs, trampolines and construction sites were also damaged.  “This city was unbelievable. The entire city got together and within a week most of everything had been repaired,” Worsley said.  Contact reporter Loretta Park at 801-625-4252 or lpark@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter at @LorettaParkSE. Like her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SELorettaPark.

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  • Increase in minimum wage proves successful in Seattle

    Restaurants in Seattle are raising their wages, upping prices and discouraging tipping as the impact of Seattle's $15 an hour minimum wage ordinance takes shape. (July 31)

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  • VIDEO: Daily News Update

    Here is the Daily News Update for Friday. July 31, 2015 with Angie Erickson.

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  • Outpouring heartens Syracuse cheerleader, family

    SYRACUSE — Almost a year ago to the date, Keyera Taylor was lending her support to the family of fellow Syracuse High cheerleader Marli Hamblin who was killed in a driveway accident. Now, Taylor and her family find themselves on the receiving end of that support. Taylor’s father, Corey, was involved in a motorcycle accident outside his home on July 24 that resulted in a fractured skull, a fractured neck and a broken rib. Corey was transported by LifeFlight helicopter to the University of Utah hospital; he has already undergone one surgery and will need another. Corey’s condition improved Wednesday to the point he was upgraded from critical to stable condition and moved from the neuro-critical care unit to the neuro-acute care unit, but he still has “a long road” ahead of him according to his wife, Denise Taylor. The same outpouring of support that Taylor and others in the Syracuse community showed for Hamblin’s family has been shown to Keyera and her family. “A lot of my friends and cheer coaches – they’ve all been checking on me, seeing if I need anything,” Keyera said. “That’s helped me a lot knowing they’re all there for me.” Specifics of how the accident occurred aren’t known (Corey doesn’t remember), but according to Denise, Corey was outside on his motorcycle when he somehow flew head first into the cement porch. The family was getting ready to leave for Pioneer Day pictures just before the accident. “Our whole world changed in five minutes,” Denise said. Denise has been overwhelmed by the support, which includes a GoFundMe page that as of Thursday morning had already resulted in $6,300 in donations. According to the page, “Corey does not have sick or vacation days at his job so when he doesn’t work, he doesn’t get paid.” “Every time I talk to him about it and tell him all the people that are donating to him and caring about him and wanting to help he just cries,” Denise said. “After he cries he says, ‘We’ve got to pay it forward. We’ve got to help someone when I get all better.’” Helping each other has been what the Syracuse and nearby communities have been all about in the wake of so many recent tragedies, and although one of Denise’s daughters believes the city is “cursed,” Denise never wants to leave. “My mom said people drop money off for us every day,” Denise said. “So many people we don’t even know. It is really a good community. I was raised there. It’s our home. We won’t go anywhere else.” Contact Standard-Examiner sports reporter Ryan Comer at rcomer@standard.net. Follow him on Twitter at @RyanComerSe and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/RyanComerSe

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  • Layton man dies in New Mexico plane crash

    TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES, New Mexico -- Two men were pronounced dead after a plane crash near a New Mexico airport, including a man from Layton. Police responded to the crash site of a Cessna Comanche aircraft near the Truth or Consequences Municipal Airport around 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, according to New Mexico State Police. The two men who died in the crash were identified as 48-year-old David Reasor from La Luz, N.M., and 37-year-old Jason Robert Glenn from Layton. The plane was registered to Reasor. The exact time and cause of the crash is unknown. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board is currently investigating. Contact reporter Andreas Rivera at 801-625-4227 or arivera@standard.net. Follow him on Twitter at @SE_Andreas.

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  • Four white lions born in zoo

    Four white lion cubs have been born at a safari park in the Crimean city of Sevastpol and are taking their first steps around their new home. (July 30)

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