Susan Lindsey is a member of the Turn Pro Jackpots Association. The association runs a winter series as well as a summer long series of barrel and pole bending races. They are involved in fundraisers during a race they host in July, at the Ogden Stadium, to help support Western Wishes, and an August race in Tremonton to support breast cancer awareness. She is a representative of Turn Pro as she helps to keep the show running smoothly by setting barrels, operating gates, or helping in the show office. Turn Pro continues to have races in the Ogden area, as well as Tremonton, throughout the summer months. There are approximately 150-barrel racers at each race who compete in either barrels or both barrels and poles.

Having competed with the Turn Pro Jackpot Association for many years, Susan says she’s seen the association go through a few changes, including changing names a few times. She also competes with the Rocky Mountain Barrel Racing Association and Utah State Western Riding Club.

Susan started riding when her parents bought the family their first horse, when she was 2 years old. As she learned to ride and developed a love for horses, she started competing in Jr. Posse, 4-H, youth rodeos and high school rodeo. At that time barrel racing associations were not what they are today. Turn Pro is a 5D (5 division) barrel racing association which makes it possible for experienced riders and horses to succeed as well as beginning riders and horses. The 5 divisions place runners in ½ second splits, like a handicap, so that the fastest horses win a check and horses that are ½ to 2 seconds slower than the fastest are able to place in another division. This makes it fun for anyone to run in a race.

Eventually, it finally came time for Susan to have her own horse, so when she was 12 years old, her father bought her a 2 year old horse and gave her the confidence that she was ready to train and manage her first horse. Since being given this responsibility and ownership, she has been hooked with owning, training, and maintaining horses. As a rider, Susan prefers barrel racing to other events, but she also notes that it is important for a horse to be mentally stimulated, just like a person, so she makes it a point to participate in all events. She always starts a horse with a reining base so that they are supple and can easily understand what she is asking them to do. When not competing, she also enjoys trail riding and show events as well. She is proud that her kids and grandkids all like to ride with her. Susan’s daughter barrel races and her two sons compete in the adult riding club along with her.

Horses have always been Susan’s passion and feels like they have truly molded her to be the person that she is today. She has learned to profile different personalities in horses as well as people, using both skills to build close relationships with those she loves. The queen contests that she has competed in, during her youth, taught her to feel confident with public speaking in groups as well as with individuals, and the relationships she has built with horses has taught her even more confidence and unconditional love. Susan currently teaches 2nd grade at Quest Academy and has found that the relationships she builds with her school children and horses are correlated. They each have their own personalities and learning styles and the task at hand is to learn to cater to both. Susan states that both children and animals are a gift from God who need to be loved, nurtured and cared for.

In her youth, Susan’s mother was always there for her as they travelled around the state to rodeo queen and competitions. Her mother taught her what true dedication and perseverance was all about. She feels grateful to have been able to pass on her knowledge and experience to her three kids and now grandchildren as they all ride and compete together. Susan has also been able to mentor and teach other children, in the community, in horsemanship skills.

The amazing friends that she has made over the many years have been and continue to be a blessing in her life. She loves to watch and participate as everyone cheers each other on and is excited for everyone’s success. Susan shares that the horse world is a tight family who cares for one another during hardships as well. She gave the example that often the community will have races to help support those who are going through tough times and to help family members financially. She has lifelong friends that she can always count on who she has met through competitions and practices. She reiterates that her own family is close because of the horse connection that they will always have. Turn Pro is one of the associations where everyone helps everyone and supports one another through the good and bad. This association is run by some amazing and ambitious people who think of others first.

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