The last sliver of southeastern Utah shown in “moderate drought” status has all but disappeared, according to the most recent map released May 23 by the U.S. Drought Monitor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

That same sliver plus a little additional area in the same region is now categorized as “abnormally dry” (the lowest level of concern), along with a thin line of land along the northeastern Utah border.

According to the map and accompanying data, 99.45% of Utah is no longer in any level of drought.

The Wasatch Front, including Davis, Weber and most of Morgan county, moved out of “abnormally dry” to normal status between April 9 and April 16.

Most of Weber and Morgan counties had moved from “moderate drought” status to “abnormally dry” between March 5 and March 26.

Davis County moved from “moderate drought” status to “abnormally dry” between March 5 and March 12.

Utah has received large amounts of precipitation during the spring.

According to the provisional data for May 28 released by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Weber-Ogden River Basin has received 129% of the usual precipitation over the course of the water year, which begins October 1.

At this point in the year, the Ben Lomond Peak measurement site has usually received about 51 inches of precipitation since the beginning of the water year, according to the NRCS. This year, it has received 69.

The Bear River Basin has received 117% of the usual precipitation over the course of the water year.

According to the NRCS, Utah’s snow water equivalent (a measure of the size of the snowpack) across the state as of May 28 is at 438% of the median amount from 1981–2010, or more than four times as large as usual.

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