Weber County election

Mail-in ballots in city races in eight Weber County locales were sent on Tuesday, July 23, 2019, to registered voters, ahead of the Aug. 13, 2019, primary. In this photo, voters fill out ballots on Election Day last year, Nov. 6, 2018, at the Weber County Library in Ogden.

OGDEN — Voting has started in the eight Weber County cities with primary battles — Ogden, Roy, North Ogden, South Ogden, West Haven, Pleasant View, Harrisville and Hooper.

Mail-in ballots were sent to around 85,000 Weber County voters on Tuesday and “a few thousand” had already been sent back to the Weber County Elections Office as of Friday, said Ryan Cowley, the county election director. Most registered voters should have received their mail-in ballots. Those who haven’t, Cowley said, should contact his office to make sure their registration is up to date.

Mail-in ballots must by postmarked by Aug. 12, while in-person voting for those who prefer the traditional method of balloting is set for Aug. 13.

Among the races on the primary ballot is the mayoral contest in Ogden. The voting will narrow the list of candidates from four to two. Vying are incumbent Mike Caldwell, Angel Castillo, Daniel Tabish and John Thompson.

The mayoral contest in Hooper, too, is on the primary ballot. Three are running, Dale Fowers, Lori Brinkerhoff and Tyce Jensen, and the top two move on.

Also on the primary ballot:

Three seats on the Roy City Council, contested by 10 hopefuls. The top six vote-getters move on.

Three seats on the South Ogden City Council, contested by seven. The top six move on.

Three seats on the North Ogden City Council, contested by 10. The top six move on.

The remaining two years of another seat on the North Ogden City Council, contested by three. The top two move on.

Three seats on the West Haven City Council, contested by eight. The top six move on.

Three seats on the Pleasant View City Council, contested by seven. The top six move on.

The remaining two years of another seat on the Pleasant View City Council, contested by three. The top two move on.

Two seats on the Hooper City Council, contested by five. The top four move on.

Three seats on the Harrisville City Council, contested by seven. The top six move on.

The primary winners meet in the Nov. 5 general election. Candidates for several other municipal contests not appearing on the primary ballot will also appear on the general election ballot.

Monday is the last day to register to vote and still get a mail-in ballot ahead of the primary. Aug. 6 is the last day to register and still be able to vote in person on Aug. 13.

Voting for city elections usually lags turnout in a presidential or other even-numbered year. In municipal elections, Cowley said, turnout is usually higher in cities with mayoral contests.

Races appear on the primary ballot only if the number of candidates is more than double the number of open spots. Primaries serve to reduce the candidate count to double the number of open posts in any given race.

Contact reporter Tim Vandenack at tvandenack@standard.net, follow him on Twitter at @timvandenack or like him on Facebook at Facebook.com/timvandenackreporter.

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