Democrats charge ahead with investigations unbowed by Trump

President Donald Trump announces his nomination of David Malpass, under secretary of the Treasury for international affairs, to head the World Bank, during an event in the Rosevelt Room of the White House, Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Yes, yes. I’m sure we can all agree that sexual harassment is a bad thing. Why, I suppose one could argue that it may even rise to the level of being a very bad thing.

However, as terrible as it is, there’s an even worse scourge sweeping the country these days, something far more insidious than sexual harassment.

Presidential harassment.

That’s right, people. The President of the United States, Donald J. Trump, is finally having his #metoo moment.

I wasn’t even aware this was a thing until Trump began pointing it out in recent speeches and tweets. The man who’s built his reputation on throwing about terms like “fake news” and “witch hunt” now has a brand new catchphrase: “Presidential harassment.”

The fact that Trump — a relatively rich white guy who is arguably the most powerful human being on the planet — is trying to play the victim card right now might be the funniest presidential bit since Lyndon B. Johnson, who I’m told used to conduct official White House business while sitting on the toilet.

This harassment the president complains of is actually a little something the U.S. Constitution calls “checks and balances.” Other terms for it: “congressional oversight,” “government watchdog.”

Trump has made a comfortable living with his in-your-face, somebody-ought-to-punch-this-person, I-could-get-away-with-murder persona. It’s what his followers say they love most about him.

• “He tells it like it is.”

• “He’s not one of those politically correct politicians.”

• “He doesn’t worry about hurting the feelings of all those liberal snowflakes out there.”

This is a man who bullies people, who calls people names, who brags about being the biggest and the best at everything, and who has the ego to label himself a “very stable genius.” But now, simply because people disagree with him and aren’t giving him exactly what he wants when he wants it, Congress and the media are harassing him?

You mean, the bully is complaining that he’s being bullied?

Well, well, well. Who’s the snowflake now?

Sorry, Mr. President, but with great power comes not just great responsibility, but equally great scrutiny. It’s part of the job. Barack Obama understood this. George W. Bush, too.

It’s curious how Trump — of all people — is crying harassment at this particular moment in history. After all of the horrible, terrible names Trump has called women. Fat pig. Dog. Horseface. Miss Piggy.

Not to mention the infamous 2005 “locker room” conversation between then-candidate Trump and TV personality Billy Bush. In describing how he’d seduce a married woman, Trump was caught on tape saying: “I just start kissing them. It’s like a magnet. Just kiss. I don’t even wait. And when you’re a star, they let you do it. You can do anything. Grab ’em by the pussy. You can do anything.”

Meaning, because of his star power as Donald Trump — and, mind you, this was before he became the leader of the free world — he insists he can do anything he wants to women. A man who bragged that he could grab women by their genitalia and they wouldn’t dare object.

And yet, this is the same poor, poor, pitiful president who complains that he’s being harassed by members of Congress and a media that has dared to reach out and grab him by his ample ego.

To those who dismiss this column as nothing more than Trump-bashing, I’ll make you a deal: You get your commander-in-chief to stop saying stupid things like this and I’ll stop writing about stupid things like this.

Fair enough?

Of course, the truly ironic part is that Republicans are supposed to be these tough-on-crime types who have no problem arming law enforcement with tools like racial profiling, as long as they think it’ll makes our country safer. So they look at someone getting pulled over for the crime of driving-while-black — or brown — and offer the weak excuse, “Hey, if they didn’t do anything wrong, they’ve got nothing to worry about.”

Ah, but given the possibility that Trump or his proxies may have committed acts that compromised our national security? These same law-abiding Americans close their eyes, stop up their ears and complain about presidential harassment from Democrats and the “fake” media.

Well, all I have to say is, “Hey, if Trump didn’t do anything wrong, he’s got nothing to worry about.”

Contact Mark Saal at 801-625-4272, or msaal@standard.net. Follow him on Twitter at @Saalman. Friend him on Facebook at facebook.com/MarkSaal.

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