If you're interested in submitting a Letter to the Editor, click here.

  • 0

Each year, Weber State University’s College of Engineering, Applied Science & Technology helps sponsor FyreCon, a convention dedicated to the creative side of fantasy and science fiction.

  • 0

As a local business owner and resident, I would like to express my appreciation to Weber County for implementing some of the best practices that make the private sector thrive. One of these practices is the use of external contractors. Sound crazy? Hear me out.

  • 0

Could the golden rule be the common denominator among those who believe the United States was founded as a Christian nation and those who believe in strict separation of church and state?

  • 0

In a recent guest commentary, the author details his opinion on the difference between “transactional” and “devotional” politicians. Like many of the recent articles published in the Standard Examiner, it included a lot of criticism from one elected officials camp to the next. It had accusat…

  • 0

I noticed the woman sitting next to me wipe her eyes a couple of times. I finally turned and asked, “Why does this make us cry?” She laughed through her tears. “I don’t know. I just can’t listen to this without crying.”

  • 0

Weber County has a wonderful opportunity to advance prosperity and the common good by re-electing Commissioner James Ebert. Nothing against his primary challenger, Gage Froerer, but there is one singular and remarkable contrast between these candidates – one perhaps you have only felt but ne…

  • 0

As we contemplate our personal thinking, many of us realize that our minds are often filled with chatter. We are constantly having conversations with ourselves. We often wish we could clear our minds and throw out the unwanted noise in our brains. But creating a vacuum in our heads cannot be…

  • 0

Power. We want it. We rebel against it. We revel in exercising it, so when we gain a little bit, it is tempting to exercise some unrighteous dominion over those without it. Our laws and governmental institutions are designed to control power in its many unwieldy forms. No one wants tyranny, …

  • 0

Next Tuesday, Utah parents can breathe a little easier when they let their children, ages 5 through 12, play at the park unsupervised, walk outside alone or wait alone in a car. May 8 is the day Senate Bill 65 goes into effect. It’s dubbed the “free-range parenting” law, though some have hap…

  • 0

Last week I wrote about how money, whether we like it or not, is tied up with our justice system. The realities and expenses of justice require that we, through our elected representatives, invest our money wisely so that the system operates in a fair and just manner.

  • 0

On the third Monday of April, Ogden native and former Weber State University track star Sarah Callister Sellers shocked the world by placing second in the Boston Marathon. Reporters asked, “Who is this previously unknown runner?” Newspapers and television stations around the world scrambled …

  • 0

Friday of last week, the local Sears in the Newgate Mall closed. When I visited I could still see the outline of the five letters of “SEARS” as gray smudges on the side of the mall. I could see the empty interior through the milked-out glass doors. To the rear, a small cadre of employees — t…

  • 0

The cliché “time is money” happens to be true. Justice requires time to be done right and in order to accomplish justice, a lot of money gets spent. Even the infrastructure of justice is expensive. Judges, clerks, courthouses, computers, security, jails, prisons, enforcement, and prosecutors…

  • 0

I vaguely remember President Richard Nixon resigning on our grainy black-and-white television when I was 11. I’ve seen so many replays of the news coverage over the years that my memory has incorporated things I couldn’t possibly have understood at that young age. I knew there were tapes, bu…

  • 0

Breaking bad habits, recovering from addiction, reassessing our daily activities — all can be rewarding exercises. Though the prospect of making changes in the way we live can seem overwhelming, there are proven tools that can help us along the way.

  • 0

Utah is a place where people strive to document memory through genealogy, scrapbooking and storytelling. Some of us live lives and archive them to provide a history of ourselves, our world and what we leave behind. Others of us leave a trace of things we have done —graduations, marriages, di…

  • 0

Recently, the Weber State University English department invited people in disciplines across campus to craft 2,000 words about the importance of writing. I agreed to take part, but explained, “If I can't say why writing is important to engineers in 500-750 words, then no engineer will believ…

  • 0

Novelty generates interest and excitement. Repetition creates boredom and indifference. We want things new and fresh, so we flock to "the new" in our consumerist hunger: books, movies, music, television, the newest hair and clothing-style crazes. We're addicted to novelty. When we go to Cost…

  • 0

No country’s firms are better at analyzing a competitive environment, strategizing to create a competitive advantage or innovating to take advantage of opportunities than America’s. American ingenuity is no myth; it is the foundation of our economic strength.

  • 0

Discussions of the recent school shooting have calmed down to a manageable roar, hopefully enough for a civil conversation. The question of what to do beyond hand-wringing and rhetoric still hangs heavily over us. As I hear the debate, I can’t help but recall what happened in the aftermath o…

  • 0

Readers send me emails after each column I write – like this one, from September: “You are so leftist and non-neutral it makes me sick, nothing positive or supportive of our great America,” wrote Lee. “Your negative views of our elected president are just an example of your twisted view of o…

  • 0

With the recent end of the annual Utah legislative session and the ongoing policymaking activities in Washington, this is a good time to discuss lobbying.

  • 0

Elizabeth Mcintyre sustained a traumatic brain injury, leaving her unable to function as an employee for the Second District Court, a job she'd held for years. Becoming disabled was a tragedy, but Elizabeth’s body has also turned against her. She's had to have vital organs removed, and the r…

  • 0

I am a native Utahn, yet every time I encounter new people, they ask, “Where are you from?” This question may seem neutral; however, there is a subtle implication that I cannot be from this place. When I share that I am a second-generation Utahn, the responses are usually shock – how did tha…

  • 0

Saturday’s Standard-Examiner editorial from Bloomberg View titled “More states should raise the red flag on gun violence” was right on. Some people are too dangerous to themselves and others to have ready access to firearms.

  • 0

Once again, tragedy strikes. The news lights up with the latest mass shooting, and we invariably revisit the same responses, across the political spectrum. Everyone is horrified and disheartened. No one wants to see any more shootings. Flags fly at half-staff. The country immediately divides…

  • 0

In the midst of all this angry news crashing around right now, I offer a quiet story. It doesn’t address man’s inhumanity to man, and all the wretched aftermath of argument, accusation, demand and dissonance — not directly anyway. I’m writing a thank-you today to a stranger I’ve never met, a…

  • 0

The National Rifle Association has won the gun battle. It has been wildly successful in its only reason for being: selling as many guns as possible.

  • 0

On the final Friday of the Olympics, the men’s American curling team defeated Sweden for the gold medal. Every four years curling takes hold of Americans’ imaginations for its finesse, strategy, the smile-inducing back-and-forth shouting as players vigorously scrub the ice, and its apparent …

  • 0

A recent incident involving a black Layton High School student who says he was spit on and called a racial slur at a school dance before being suspended himself quickly caught the attention of Standard-Examiner readers.

  • 0

So my last two columns have each been challenged. First, my column on the $3 trillion loss in the stock market  in early February prompted a letter to the editor from Richard Copp, who correctly pointed out that one line in my column was incorrect. I wrote that “last week, in just one day, a…