• Ugandan children’s choir delivers inspiring message to Utah

    WASHINGTON TERRACE — Nearly two dozen Ugandan kids swayed in time to the beat as they sang, harmonizing with one another while performing this week for a few local congregations in Top of Utah. They have spent the last couple months traveling across the country, raising awareness for the over 3 million orphaned children in Uganda. The students, ages 9 to 20, are all a part of the Imani Milele non-profit organization, an orphanage for children in Uganda. Many have spent most of their lives with the orphanage, like 19-year-old Josephine Namuddu, whose mother died from an illness when she was 6 years old and her father became unemployed and left the children to fend for themselves. The organization rescued Namuddu and her siblings, giving them food, clothing and an education. Now, at age 19, Namuddu is ready to go to college. “They showed me that there is hope and that I could have a future that is successful,” said Namuddu, who has helped design the traveling choir’s costumes. The group performed at the Community United Methodist Church in Washington Terrace. Claudette Rothwell, a member of the congregation, was astonished when she met them and heard the kids sing. “This group just melts your heart because they are just grateful for everything you give them. You would think they didn’t have a problem in the world, but they are sweet and as happy as can be,” Rothwell said. “I don’t think our kids even come close to realizing how lucky they are. These children can’t help being born in Uganda, and they don’t have everything we have here. It really does touch your heart.” Choir director, Sam Straxy of Uganda, knows the struggles many of the children have endured but the group’s mission is to teach the children to look forward and rely on their faith in Jesus Christ. “It is really humbling, especially for me who knows their stories of abuse and neglect,” Straxy said. “But when you see them smiling, you don’t see that because of the messages they share, which is from the heart because they have been through a lot.” When the choir isn’t performing, the students are studying. There is a high rate of illiteracy in Uganda because education isn’t free and many can’t afford to go, Straxy said. Twenty-year-old Jimmy Ssemwanga, has been with the orphanage for about 11 years and came to the group when his father died and his mother couldn’t financially take care of all nine of her children. He is now ready to start college but he still remembers the life he had before the orphanage rescued him. “It made me sad to see so many bad things happening at home, but coming here, I have grown up with spirit and courage,” Ssemwanga said. The children’s choir learns and memorizes songs on dime, having taught themselves a new song while staying at the Community United Methodist Church about hope and dreaming of a city in heaven with Jesus where they will one day visit. The organization has brought a traveling choir to the United States a couple of times, but this is the first time the group has traveled west. Now Ssemwanga says he can say he has friends across the world. “I attribute everything in my life to God, and now I have an opportunity now to talk and share with other people on the other side of the planet,” Ssemwanga said. When Straxy brought his choir with their traveling leaders to Utah, they didn’t know a soul, but as they prepared to leave the Community United Methodist Church he said, “We came in as strangers, but already, we feel like family. God has always opened up opportunities for us to sing.” CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story listed an incorrect community where the group performed.

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  • Questions linger Friday after man shot UHP trooper, then himself

    LAYTON — The Davis County Critical Incident Protocol Team will spend the next several weeks combing through evidence and poring over statements to find out what led to the shootout in front of an apartment complex early Friday, Aug. 28.  Drew Morgan Moyer, 21, died from what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound after exchanging gunfire with Utah Highway Patrol Sgt. Paul Kotter at 2:20 a.m. in Layton, said UHP Sgt. Todd Royce. RELATED: Man who reportedly shot at UHP trooper near Hill AFB identified Moyer pulled out of the parking lot of Overlook at Sunset Point Apartments, 2955 N. 400 West, and into the construction zone at the intersection of Hillfield Road and Highway 193 and stopped in an area were the public was restricted, Royce said. Kotter, along with three other troopers, were at the construction site doing a “construction detail,” which happens regularly, Royce said. When significant construction on an interstate or state road causes a road closure, contracted construction companies are required to have troopers on site to help with traffic concerns, Royce said. The troopers work an overtime shift and the construction company reimburses the state. Kotter approached the car Moyer was sitting in and asked Moyer to leave the area before turning to walk back to his own car, Royce said. At that time, Moyer shot at Kotter, who then returned gunfire. Kotter was struck in the lower back twice and once in the buttocks, Royce said. Construction workers alerted the other officers in the area that Kotter needed help. “His (bullet-proof) vest definitely helped,” Royce said. One of the bullets penetrated the vest and fragmented into Kotter’s back. Kotter underwent surgery at McKay-Dee Hospital Friday morning. Royce said he was told Kotter was in good spirits following the surgery. Moyer fled west on Highway 193 and crashed into a water truck at about 725 West, Royce said. Two of the troopers at the scene gave aid to Kotter, who was conscious and talking, while a third trooper followed Moyer. When officers approached Moyer’s car, he was dead from what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound, according to law enforcement. Officers do not know why Moyer was at the apartment complex or if he lived there, Layton Police Lt. Travis Lyman said. Lyman is also on the protocol team. As of Friday evening, few details were released about Moyer by law enforcement, and attempts to gather details about his residence and connection to the area were not successful.  Highway 193 was closed from 800 West to Hillfield Road for more than seven hours. Hillfield Road was also closed from 2500 North. Traffic to Hill Air Force Base’s south gate was diverted. (the story continues below the map) [gmap=41.102919, -111.974054] PROTOCOL According to the Standard-Examiner’s archives, Friday’s shooting was the second officer-involved shooting in Davis County this year. In January, Thomas Hamby died after being shot by two officers in Syracuse. That shooting was ruled justifiable by the state Attorney General’s Office.  Including Friday’s shooting there have been 19 officer-involved shootings in Davis County since 2007. Davis County’s protocol team usually turns its findings over to the Davis County Attorney’s Office to review the case.  The protocol team consists of members each different law enforcement agency in Davis County and they are charged with investigating any incident in which an officer shoots a service firearm. The members from the agency or agencies being investigated are not part of respective investigations.  THE INVESTIGATION SO FAR Kotter’s car and Moyer’s car, which was severely damaged from the crash and also had bullet holes in it, were taken to a secure area to be processed by crime scene investigators, said Layton Police Lt. Travis Lyman, who is part of the protocol team.  Lyman sent an email Friday afternoon stating that Kotter was assigned to a training division and drove an unmarked vehicle that does not have a dash mounted camera. Other police agencies that responded to the scene had dash cameras and the protocol team will review the videos to determine evidentiary value.   Royce said usually only officers who fired their guns are placed on paid administrative leave during the investigation. Kotter was the only officer at the scene who fired his gun, so the other three officers will likely return to active duty. As of Friday afternoon, Kotter remained in the hospital recovering from the gunshot wounds.  Besides working as a trooper, Kotter teaches at Weber State University. Jack Rickards, director of the university’s Law Enforcement Academy, said Kotter teaches radar and lidar (measuring distance by illuminating a target with a laser and analyzing the reflected light), as well as field sobriety testing, assisting with intoxication training and is one of four coordinators for the law enforcement programs. “I think (Kotter) acted in an incredibly professional and courageous way as a fellow officer,” Rickards said. “I’m glad he’s still with us.” Rickards said Kotter is one of those instructors who “champions” for the young officers and cadets to succeed. You can reach reporter Loretta Park at lpark@standard.net or at 801-625-4252. Follow her on Twitter at @LorettaParkSE or like her on Facebook.

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  • Shooting near Hill AFB leads to one man dead, injured trooper

    UPDATE: Man who reportedly shot at UHP trooper near HIll AFB identified LAYTON — One man is dead and a state highway trooper was injured after an incident in a construction zone hear Hill Air Force Base, according to reports from Utah Highway Patrol.  At 2:20 a.m. Friday, a car pulled into a construction site near the intersection of Highway 193 and Hill Field Road, according to UHP Sgt. Todd Royce.  The man driving the car was told to leave by a UHP trooper Sgt. Paul Kotter and, as the trooper was returning to his vehicle, the driver opened fire, Royce said.  Kotter was with three other officers on a "construction" detail at the time of the incident, Royce said. UHP Sgt. Todd Royce said the shooting happened at the intersection of Highway 193 and Hill Field Road. — Loretta Park (@LorettaParkSE) August 28, 2015 Kotter, who has been with UHP for more than 15 years, returned fire but he was shot three times, twice in the back and once in the buttocks. He was sent to McKay-Dee Hospital, and underwent surgery for not life-threatening injuries.   Kotter's bullet-proof vest "really helped in this situation," Royce said. [image=Sgt. Paul Kotter] Two officers gave aid to Kotter while the third followed the car west on Highway 193. It crashed into the rear of a road paint truck near 725 West and Highway 193. Royce said when the trooper approached the car with the suspect, "it was obvious he had died of an apparent self-inflicted gun shot wound." The man who died has not yet been identified. HAFB South gate closed for next several hours for officer involved shooting investigation. pic.twitter.com/Ehpf0L23aZ — Layton Police (@laytonpolice) August 28, 2015 Follow @LorettaParkSE for updates.   In the meantime, the Davis County Critical Incident Protocol Team is handling the investigation, per police protocol. The unit is made up of officers from every law enforcement agency in Davis County. The south gate to the air force base was closed for several hours. Highway 193 was closed from 800 West to Hill Field Road and Hill Field Road was closed at 2500 North. "State Route 193 and Hill Field Road near the South Gate are closed this morning for an ongoing investigation by local law enforcement,“ HAFB officials said in a prepared statement. ”Authorities expect SR193 and the South Gate will remain closed until sometime after noon today. During this time, the West Gate visitor's center, Southwest Gate and East Gate will remain open. The West Gate and Roy Gate remain open as normal. We will send out an update as soon as the decision is made to reopen the roads. Please be patient as we wait to hear from local law enforcement during this developing situation." At approximately 9:50 a.m., Highway 193 and Hill Field Road were cleared and opened.  By 12:10 p.m., all gates at HAFB were opened. All gates at @HAFB back to normal operating schedules. — Hill Air Force Base (@HAFB) August 28, 2015

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  • Ogden youths in custody benefit from cultural shift

    OGDEN — Mill Creek Youth Center adopted a mascot last year. “Now we're the Mill Creek Mavericks,” said Benjamin Carrier, whose duties as principal at Ogden School District's Washington High School include overseeing education at Mill Creek. “Any high school you go to is going to have a mascot.” Mill Creek Youth Center isn't just any high school — it's a long-term secure facility for youth in custody. The adoption of a mascot is just one example of what Carrier calls a cultural shift, moving from viewing the center as a prison to seeing it more as a school. “We're trying to do everything we can to make it as much of an authentic high school experience as possible,” he said, explaining that if Mill Creek is too different from a traditional school experience, it can be difficult for youth who are released to make the transition back to their local school. Mike Shaw, Mill Creek director, has worked in the juvenile justice system for 26 years. It's changed immensely over that time. [gmap=41.244679, -111.994329] But making it more like high school doesn't change the fact that kids are incarcerated. “They are held accountable for what they did in society,” said Shaw. The idea is to help students look at the time they're serving as an opportunity for change rather than punishment. “There are studies that show that it helps to reduce recidivism when they come out, if they come out with skills through education and through treatment,” he said. Some of the changes made over the past year seem small and simple; for example, putting in a bell system. “Before that, the kids were escorted by security guards from one room to the other. Now they hear a bell,” Carrier said. “They need to get to their class on time, and they're marked tardy if they're not.” Students work with community volunteers from the University of Utah Reading Clinic. “We've seen a half-grade level increase in the past year,” said Shaw. [image=Mill Creek basketball] Another high school tradition is competitive sports, and students at Mill Creek are now able to test their skills against youth in other secure facilities from Logan to St. George. The games have a deeper purpose than just allowing teens to play ball like their peers. “One of the down sides to a facility like Mill Creek, where there's so much staff, is that a lot of the decision-making is taken away from the kids. They're woken up in the morning. They're escorted to school. They're escorted to their classes. Food is provided for them. There are just not a whole lot of decisions that can be made,” he said. “By having them be part of sports teams, they're put in situations where they have to make the decisions and choices.” And for the most part, Carrier said the students are making good decisions on the court or field. “I formerly was over athletics in our district,” he said. “I can promise you the sportsmanship that I've seen between our facilities here has been absolutely phenomenal — in many cases, it has been much better than what I have seen in some of our traditional school settings.” Students also compete in flag football, volleyball and softball. Officials are looking at adding ultimate Frisbee, ping pong and chess tournaments. [image=Mill Creek mural project] Students also have had the opportunity to create art through a partnership with the local non-profit Nurture the Creative Mind Foundation. Students worked with a professional muralist to paint over the school's institutional, white cinder block walls. • RELATED: “Powerful photography highlights youth center students,” June 25, 2015  • RELATED: “Artist works with teens to create mural filled with hope,” Oct. 31, 2014 “A small thing that we started doing this last year is making birthday cakes for all of the kids on their birthday,” said Carrier, noting that the cake mixes are donated by local churches. “The sad reality, for some students, is that they're 17 or 18 years old and this is the first time ever that they've been given a cake and that they've ever been sang to.” Carrier said the cakes are part of changing the culture and seeing the students as kids, instead of incarcerated youth. “As you get to know them, you start to really see some of the pain and just inward frustration they've had throughout life,” he said. “It becomes a lot easier to see their behavior as a negative symptom of something bigger going on in their life.” Students who graduate from high school are honored in a traditional graduation program. “This year we had 16 graduates, and many of them are the first in their family to graduate from high school,” Carrier said. “There are many times they like to portray a pretty tough and rough exterior, but when it comes down to it, these are young men and young women and it's a very emotional and exciting experience for them when they truly have a chance to succeed.” Education doesn't have to stop with graduation. “They can be sentenced until they're 21, and so we will have kids that will graduate but still have a year or two left on their sentence,” Carrier said. “All we've been able to do is have them repeat the same high school classes they just graduated from, which was clearly very frustrating for them and often they weren't the most model student in that situation.” The solution was to partner with Weber State University to offer concurrent enrollment, allowing students to continue to progress. “This last end of school year, we had three students who successfully completed classes, and have college credits under their belt,” Carrier said.  Mill Creek staff and teachers are also looking at a partnership with Ogden-Weber Applied Technology College, hoping to give students career skills in everything from masonry to carpentry.  Travis Cook, education specialist in alternative and adult education with the state Office of Education, said Utah's leaders were wise when they dedicated a line item to provide for compulsory education for these students. “Over time, it allowed for a concerted effort to ensure that this student population was not left behind, or forgotten, as they were not able to access traditional campuses,” he said. Contact reporter Becky Wright at 801-625-4274 or bwright@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter at @ReporterBWright.

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  • VIDEO: Mill Creek Youth Center making positive changes

    Mill Creek Youth Center is making positive changes, plus Weber Area 911 and Emergency Services District is needing a bigger space and some great news for WSU fans — all that in the Daily News Update for Thursday, August 27, 2015 with Angie Erickson. 

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  • Suicide attempt survivor tries to save others from misperception

    OGDEN — “I don’t need anybody to validate me.” That one sentence, said Paula Miller, was the hardest to learn. Forming those seven words was decades in the making. She rattles off all forms of help she’s sought throughout her lifetime, from counseling to behavioral units and to community classes at Your Community Connection. Miller, 56, a survivor of suicide who also turned herself in before she could attempt suicide a second time, has made it her life mission to help others so they won’t have to go through similar troubles. [image=BS 082515 Paula Miller 02] A volunteer at the Ogden Women’s Retreat House, Miller gets a lot of chances to reach out. She helps people see their own value. “It’s all about experience, strength and hope,” she said. “What people need to hear — I know how you feel.” • RELATED: Too many young lives lost to suicide; Utah ranks fifth in the nation Often, her task is to help others see how their destructive acts actually are selfish because they can’t see beyond their circumstance. “People are dying because of their perceptions and they are not the truth,” she said. “Where did this idea come from? I am worth only to destroy?” Miller said she just wants women to learn their worth. “There is something greater out there. It’s love,” she said. She knows what it’s like to need such messages, having been plagued by emotional pain including relationship problems.  Miller recalled the night she sat in a warm bathtub having cut herself with broken glass on her wrists and ankles. [image=BS 082515 Paula Miller 07-5] At first, she found peace because she could feel no pain. She was comforted knowing her troubles would soon be over. But then, Miller said, her conscience kicked in. She could hear the voices of her children as they would wonder why she could hurt them so deeply. Miller has survived to be able to answer that question. She said she hurt others because she was hurt herself. She was hurt because she was abused in her childhood and her mind could not sort out the consequences. But on that night when she tried suicide in an irrational state, Miller then was nearly unsuccessful in her attempt to save herself. She drove to the hospital and parked across the street. She said she fainted in the emergency room just as she made it there in the rain, leaving a trail of red puddles as she went. Miller said she had a dysfunctional upbringing. “We were taught we had no voice. We keep secrets,” she said.  She grew up not knowing that others were suffering too. Miller said she found that out after she saved herself from her second brush with suicide by checking into a hospital behavioral unit. Meeting others in the unit was life-changing for Miller, she said. “For me, the biggest relief that I’ve ever felt was to find out I was not the only one going through what I was going through,” she said. [image=BS 082515 Paula Miller 04-2] “I received the biggest clarity,” she said. “And then I was sad to learn that it happens too many times.” But knowing that the world can be a dark place was much better than being alone, Miller said. “The feeling of aloneness is just a killer,” she said. She remembers talking to herself in this way: “Wow! Something is wrong with me that doesn’t seem to be wrong with anybody else. People just don’t understand.” And now, Miller gets to be the woman who understands in other women’s lives. She said the chance to be there for others makes her own life worth living.  There’s also the family whose voices she heard that night she wanted to die. “If I had ended my life, I wouldn’t be here for my grandchildren,” she said, noting the joy she gets from their innocence. The Standard-Examiner is devoting coverage throughout this year to preventing teen suicide with the message that help is available. Those close to this issue urge everyone to be aware of the signs of suicidal thoughts and to make efforts to reach out before a suicidal person carries out his or her plans. Experts advise in an emergency crisis situation to call 911. If more time is available, those needing help or wishing to help others may call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.   You may reach reporter JaNae Francis at 801-625-4228. Follow her on Twitter at @JaNaeFrancisSE or like her on Facebook.

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  • VIDEO: Know the 'Cats: WSU's linebackers get physical

    OGDEN — In last year’s Weber State game against Portland State, linebacker Emmett Tela collided with teammate Jawian Harrison. “I blacked out for a little bit. It was pretty scary,” Tela recalled. “Everyone rushed the field and they were like, ‘Come on, you can do it. Get up, get up.’ I really tried, but I couldn’t.” Tela, a promising freshman, sustained a neck injury, was taken off the field in an ambulance, and transported to the hospital. His team and Wildcats fans were left holding their breath. “For a little bit it was really scary, but I said a prayer and my family helped me get through it,” Tela said. “After that, I was feeling a lot better.” The injury turned out to be nothing more serious than a muscle strain. Tela was cleared to play before spring ball earlier this year. “I’m really excited. It feels nice to be back in this space,” he said. As a sophomore, Tela will take a leadership role with the linebackers. He expects to earn conference recognition for the linebacker crew’s work, and not take take time off. KNOW THE CATS • Work with running backs • The ’Jack City Boys’ • WSU’s young wide receivers • Those tricky special teams • The ’superheroes’ on the offensive line • ’The Goon Squad’ is the defensive line “(I want us to) come together as a group and just really ball out,” Tela said. “Picks, tackles, everything, just balling out.” Junior linebacker Tre’von Johnson says that the senior-less group is committing errors in camp, but the leaders, such as himself, help keep the young players moving forward. “We’re making mistakes still, just trying to learn the assignments. We’ve got a lot of new guys in,” Johnson said. “You’ve got to push them along because they get discouraged when they mess up on an assignment. We’ve been trying to keep their heads on straight, getting in the film room with them, just anything to push them along.” Transitioning into a leadership role has not been an issue for Johnson. He’s received playing time since he arrived as a freshman and feels comfortable being a vocal leader. “I’ve always been a leader. Last year I was a leader too. I didn’t have a leader role, but I feel like I stepped up when I needed to,” he said. “People look to me for things and advice and I’m there for them anytime ... I look at myself as a senior. I’ve played since I was a freshman, so I know the game, I know things that the younger guys don’t know.” Despite the growing pains, WSU linebacker coach Lance Hunsaker said the newer and younger players are showing promise. “Landon Stice has really stepped up,” he said. “We had some guys beat up early, and seeing him jump in there as a true freshman and not be scared of the speed and the physicality of the college game versus the high school game, and putting his nose in there to battle, has been a lot of fun to watch.” The linebacker crew also features Nebraska transfer and Bingham High graduate Jared Afalava, sophomore Alema Key, redshirt freshman Karsen Liljenquist, and Riverton native Lagrand Toia. Hunsaker said physicality will be the identity of this group, with confidence in executing their assignments. “I just really want them to be as physical and as sound in their assignments as possible,” Hunsaker said. “Anyone can run to the ball, but who can execute their assignments at a high level when live bullets are flying, when you’re tired, when drives extend? They’ve got to make sure they’re doing what they’re supposed to do and make plays within the scheme.” Contact sports reporter Brandon Garside at bgarside@standard.net, on Twitter @BrandonGarside and on Facebook.com/BrandonGarsideSE.

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  • Victim of Van Buren Ave. shooting died Sunday, police confirm

    OGDEN -- Police confirmed Wednesday, Aug. 26, the victim of an alleged drive-by shooting last week died from his injuries Sunday. Officials confirmed that Corbin Samuel McGuire, 18, was the victim who was riding his bike Thursday afternoon, Aug. 20, on the 2300 block of Van Buren Avenue, where witnesses say he was shot by suspects passing in a silver vehicle. RELATED: Van Buren Ave. drive-by shooting suspect still on the loose, Aug. 20, 2015 McGuire, of Roy, was taken to the hospital in critical condition where he died Sunday, Ogden Police Lt. Danielle Croyle said.  Police did not release any new information about the case at that time, including the identity of the victim, due to complications in the case, Croyle said.  McGuire was in Ogden visiting friends at the time of the incident. As of Wednesday, there were no updates or new leads in the case, Croyle said.  The Ogden-Metro Gang Unit is investigating the case, which is now a homicide.  Police say anyone with information can contact them at 801-629-8221. Information can be given anonymously. You can reach reporter Andreas Rivera at arivera@standard.net or at 801-625-4227. Follow him on Twitter at @SE_Andreas or like him on Facebook.

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  • Fire injures 3 at Centerville home

    CENTERVILLE - Firefighters extinguished a kitchen fire that injured three people, two of whom were sent to the hospital for treatment Wednesday night.   Firefighters responded to the 911 call at 7:50 p.m. to a home at 2340 N. 650 West and were able to douse the flames within minutes, according to Chief Jeff Bassett of South Davis Metro Fire. The fire was contained to the kitchen area and is believed to have originated from the stove gas range. Four adults were in the home at the time of the fire and unsuccessfully attempted to extinguish the flames using a fire extinguisher. Two men, a father and his son, received smoke inhalation injuries and were taken to the University of Utah Hospital. One woman’s hands were also burned, but Bassett said that all of the injuries were minor. The cause of the fire is unknown and officials are still investigating the incident, Basset said. The house was rendered temporarily uninhabitable because of the damage and the homeowner is staying with family. [gmap] Contact reporter Taylor Hintz at 801-625-4231 or thintz@standard.net. Follow on Twitter @TaylorHintz.

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  • Owner of doghouse that initiated fatal I-15 crash comes forward

    OGDEN — The owner of a doghouse that fell off a trailer onto the freeway, leading to a crash that killed a Layton man and his daughter last weekend, contacted Utah Highway Patrol and identified himself for having not secured the load, police said Wednesday, Aug. 26. A family of four traveling to a family dinner was rear-ended at high speed in a traffic jam triggered by the doghouse that tumbled onto Interstate 15 near Riverdale. A Chevrolet Monte Carlo struck the family’s car, pushing it underneath the semi-trailer stopped in front of them. Ryan Chambers, 30, and his 4-year-old daughter Evelynn were killed in the crash. Ryan’s wife, Alyssa, and 7-year-old daughter Kaya were seriously injured. UHP Sgt. Todd Royce said the doghouse owner was unaware he had lost the load until further down the road. He then returned home. Police reports in the media on Monday identified the road debris as a doghouse, and the man called UHP Monday night after hearing reports of the fatal crash. “He has been completely cooperative with us,” Royce said. “I would understand that he feels a little devastated by this.” The accident is under investigation and charges have not been filed. Royce said that besides investigating and determining appropriate charges for the unsecured doghouse on the freeway, police are also investigating the cause of the subsequent vehicle crash. Officers said the driver of the Monte Carlo apparently did not apply the brakes. “This fatal crash would not have happened if either one of these factors were taken out,” Royce said. “It’s so very tragic that half a family is gone now.” The UHP declined to release the identities of the Monte Carlo driver and the doghouse owner. The Chambers family has set up a Gofundme account as well as the Ryan and Evee Chambers Charitable Account at America First Credit Union for anyone wishing to help. Contact reporter Taylor Hintz at 801-625-4231 or thintz@standard.net. Follow on Twitter @TaylorHintz.

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  • Shot in the Mountains album mixes stirring vocals with rootsy-edge

    After securing the cash to record from a crowdsource fundraising campaign, local “rockicana” band Shot in the Mountains produced its debut full-length album, “Noscitur” and released it early August. The 10-track record features the powerhouse of a lead vocalist Melissa Harper. She nimbly picks her way through the album, giving each song the exact treatment it needs. The soulful and wistful “I Don’t Wanna Go,” showcases her abilities on acoustic guitar, as well as vocals. Shot in the Mountains blends roots, with a Americana and a hint of blues. That particular lineup of flavors is showcased in “Can’t Run Forever.” I like the slow pace and steady drumwork in this song, as well as the lyrics. Not unlike the other songs on the album, the lyrics in “Mama” take the listener to the forefront of wild frontier narratives, both modern and vintage. This song is one of my favorites for the harmonica and subtle harmonies in the background. Plus, the chorus is really catchy and the song was featured on an episode of SE Music Scoop that can be viewed on Standard.net. [image=band1] RELATED: Local Americana band funds album through fans RELATED: Shot in the Mountains on SE Music Scoop Another favorite track on the album is “Lake Payette,” which mixes in keys, stirring vocals and some electric guitar. That being said, the song starts out unexpectedly, with the soft piano being Harper’s only accompaniment until the quiet and simple musings of an electric guitar weave through. The build up is contagious, because the listener knows something is going to change, and the climaxes is perfectly executed. “Playing the Fool” nods to each band member’s depth for pushing the limits on the genre parameters Shot in the Mountains has setup for itself. As the most energetic song on the album, it really puts the rock in the rockicana moniker I assigned the band. Matt Tribe’s keyboards, along with the entire band backing up, take the song over the top. Shot in the Mountains new album “Noscitur” is available to listen to on Spotify, and is available to purchase on iTunes. Contact reporter Raychel Johnson at 801-625-4279 or rajohnson@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter @raychelNEWS.

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  • VIDEO: Today's top headlines

    Here is the Daily News Update for Wednesday, August 26, 2015 with Angie Erickson. 

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