• Solo rocker presents looping show to Ogden friends

    A musician with a long-standing love affair and friendship with Ogden is returning with her guitar, drum machine, synth, and bass in tow. Talia Keys, known for her musical abilities lovingly spread out in five different projects, is coming to the Ogden Amphitheater to rock out with Todo Mundo and Brian Ernst August 5. Keys, known for her band Marinade, has had a busy summer. From her 30-day stint on the road crisscrossing the American South, to a music festival in Michigan known as Electric Forest, Keys has still found the time to record her latest album, “Fool’s Gold.” “I think the recording process has been beautiful for me, because this is the first time that I’ve done it this way where I’ve taken all my songs and started from scratch and recorded most of the parts myself,” Keys said, adding she brought in a horn section, a choir and special guests to star on the album. “The thing about recording is, that’s all fine and dandy, but I feel like the meat and potatoes is in the performance. That’s what music is for me, it’s the performance, it’s the show, the production, it’s the music festivals,” she continued. “I would much rather be doing that stuff than sitting in a control booth making music; but it’s been a beautiful thing. This is the most proud I’ve ever been of a record I made.” [image=talia1] Collaboration and friendship Keys is most at home with a mic in her face and a drumkit at her disposal. Although she tours solo out of financial necessity, Keys said there’s nothing like sharing the stage with friends. “My looping shows are fun, but I do those out of necessity. I do have a lot of fun because I am able to do a one-on-one connection with the audience, but something has to be said when you get together with other human beings and you use your ears and your hearts and you make music together,” she said. “You can’t recreate that anywhere.” Keys is in luck; although she’s booked as a solo act for the Ogden date, she’s co-billed with her friend and fellow musician Brian Ernst. Ernst, who is known for traveling the world with his wife in a bus fueled by vegetable oil, is a multi-instrumentalist in his own right, and will collaborate with Keys live on stage. Keys and Ernst will be “trading songs,” and will play little elements of each other’s music during the show. [image=talia2] “He’s one of my best friends and inspirations, so I thought why not bring him in and introduce him to my Ogden family, because he has yet to play Ogden and I thought it would be the perfect place for him to be,” Keys said. “I do have a love for Ogden, and I’m happy Brian is going to be there. He plays guitar, didgeridoo, slide guitars, he does a bunch of different stuff as well.” Fools Gold The Ogden family Keys refers to was instrumental in the production process of “Fool’s Gold,” which was released July 31. Greg Shaw, who is known for his bass skills in multiple projects in the local area, co-produced “Fools Gold,” along with Keys, her partner Melahn Atkinson and Mike Sasich at Man vs Music Studios in Salt Lake City. Keys sought a new flavor and perspective for the album, which includes songs from her years of making music with Marinade, which played its final show under that name last week. “My music has always changed. Even when Marinade started, Marinade kept changing and growing and (had) different music styles,” Keys said. “The more you play the more you learn. I literally started Marinade in my mom’s living room, just jamming and drinking beer. We did it for fun, and now it’s my full-time hustle, this is what I do for a living.” [image=talia3] For “Fool’s Gold,” Keys made scratch tracks of the vocals and guitar, and used those as the foundation to record the rest of the album. She had Shaw lay down the bass on three tracks because, “why not?” “‘Fool’s Gold’ is a highly political album, but also with a little, some funny songs here and there too, just my style. I’d say my voice is the strongest thing that I have right now,” Keys said. “I feel like the song, the story that you have to tell, is the most important aspect of any song.” Talia Keys & Brian Ernst and Todo Mundo will provide the soundtrack for the Wednesday night concert at the Ogden Amphitheater. The concert is free and open to the public. Dancing and singing along is recommended. Contact reporter Raychel Johnson at 801-625-4279 or rajohnson@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter @raychelNEWS. PREVIEW WHAT: Talia Keys & Brian Ernst, and Todo Mundo WHEN: 7 p.m. Aug. 5 WHERE: Ogden Amphitheater, 343 Historic 25th Street, Ogden ADMISSION: Free

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  • Four fallen Utah soldiers honored during memorial torch ride

    OGDEN -- Flags lined the entrance of the Fred J. Grant Veterans of Foreign Wars Post on Monday as several parading motorcycles drove down 12th street in Ogden to honor America’s fallen soldiers. The memorial flame, which will remain lit throughout the 2,500-mile tribute ride, was proudly burning and being pulled on a trailer in remembrance of America’s fallen soldiers. The 2,500-mile Tribute to Fallen Soldiers Memorial Torch Motorcycle Ride escorts the memorial torch through Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota, visiting the homes of fallen soldiers along the way. The third annual memorial ride honored four fallen Utah soldiers in particular as it passed through the state: Sgt. Shawn M. Nelson of Brigham City, Spc. Ryan T. Christensen of Layton, Spc. David M. Gannon of West Jordan and Spc. Cody Towse of Elk Ridge. The memorial ride had just left Brigham City before arriving in Ogden. “It’s usually a very emotional experience for us and the families,” said Mike Freeman, a tribute rider who will be completing all legs of the 2,500-mile ride. “I’m a veteran, and this is something I feel like I need to do. All veterans, living or passed, need to be honored.” The veteran bikers were escorted by the Ogden Police Department to 12th street at midday, where they stopped at the VFW Post for lunch. “It was an honor they picked our post for their stop,” said Doug Ferguson, commander of the VFW post. “We do approximately 150 military honors at our post each year for veterans who have passed away. They chose us out of all the posts in the area. We often win awards for our community service - we were selected because of all the things we do in northern Utah.” Ferguson was a Salute Battery Commander in the Vietnam war and fired the 21-gun salute for Dwight D. Eisenhower. As much of an honor as that was, Ferguson said, being a part of the honoring of fallen soldiers is comparable in meaning. “It’s more significant to me to do these individual honors than Eisenhower’s,” Ferguson said. “Those families lost a son or daughter and it means a lot to them when they see so many riders show up who care.” The Tribute to Fallen Soldiers memorial ride changes its route every year so different soldiers and their families can be honored, said Warren Williamson, executive director of Tribute to Fallen Soldiers. Riders who participate can complete any number of legs they desire in the cross-state ride. “Our staff is very small,” Williamson said. “We have a core group of eight people riding the entire 2,500 miles. The other riders come and go at each post.” Williamson said a total of 25 soldiers and their families will be honored during this year’s ride, the highest number in seven years. This is also the first year the families will be presented with a hand-painted portrait of their fallen soldier along with a memorial plaque of distinguished service. “Every time we do a ceremony, the families always say, ‘We thought our fallen soldier would be forgotten’,” Williamson said. “It is something special to me to alleviate that fear.” After departing from Ogden, the tribute ride drove through Layton and Salt Lake City. Tuesday they visit West Jordan and Elk Ridge on their way to Colorado. The tribute ride will end on Aug. 3 and the memorial flame will be extinguished in Sturgis, South Dakota at the 75th anniversary of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.  Although Williamson is not a veteran himself, organizing the memorial torch ride is his way to give back to America’s heroes, he said.  “Perfect strangers show up at these homes to remind the families we are never going to forget their fallen soldier,” Williamson said. “It is an amazing, touching moment when they open the door and see 50 to 100 veterans on motorcycles supporting them.” Contact reporter Mekenna Malan at 801-625-4280 or mmalan@standard.net.

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  • Boy Scout board approves end to blanket ban on gay adults

    NEW YORK — The Boy Scouts of America on Monday ended its blanket ban on gay adult leaders while allowing church-sponsored Scout units to maintain the exclusion for religious reasons. The new policy, aimed at easing a controversy that has embroiled the Boy Scouts for years, takes effect immediately. It was approved by the BSA’s National Executive Board on a 45-12 vote during a closed-to-the-media teleconference. “For far too long this issue has divided and distracted us,” said the BSA’s president, former Defense Secretary Robert Gates. “Now it’s time to unite behind our shared belief in the extraordinary power of Scouting to be a force for good.” An official statement from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said officials weren’t able to meet yet to decide how they would respond to the ruling. “The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is deeply troubled by today’s vote by the Boy Scouts of America National Executive Board,” reads the statement. “In spite of a request to delay the vote, it was scheduled at a time in July when members of the church’s governing councils are out of their offices and do not meet. When the leadership of the church resumes its regular schedule of meetings in August, the century-long association with Scouting will need to be examined.” The statement said the church has always welcomed all boys to its Scouting units regardless of sexual orientation. However, the admission of openly gay leaders is inconsistent with the doctrines of the Church and what have traditionally been the values of the Boy Scouts of America. “As a global organization with members in 170 countries, the church has long been evaluating the limitations that fully one-half of its youth face where Scouting is not available,” reads the statement. “Those worldwide needs combined with this vote by the BSA National Executive Board will be carefully reviewed by the leaders of the Church in the weeks ahead.” The stage had been set for Monday’s action by the Boy Scouts on May 21, when Gates told the Scouts’ national meeting that the long-standing ban on participation by openly gay adults was no longer sustainable. He said the ban was likely to be the target of lawsuits that the Scouts likely would lose. Two weeks ago, the new policy was approved unanimously by the BSA’s 17-member National Executive Committee. It would allow local Scout units to select adult leaders without regard to sexual orientation — a stance that several Scout councils have already adopted in defiance of the official national policy. In 2013, after heated internal debate, the BSA decided to allow openly gay youth as scouts, but not gay adults as leaders. Several denominations that collectively sponsor close to half of all Scout units — including the Roman Catholic church, the Mormon church and the Southern Baptist Convention — have been apprehensive about ending the ban on gay adults. The BSA’s top leaders have pledged to defend the right of any church-sponsored units to continue excluding gays as adult volunteers. But that assurance has not satisfied some conservative church leaders,‘ “It’s hard for me to believe, in the long term, that the Boy Scouts will allow religious groups to have the freedom to choose their own leaders,” said the Rev. Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission. “In recent years I have seen a definite cooling on the part of Baptist churches toward the Scouts,” Moore said. “This will probably bring that cooling to a freeze.” The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints issued the following statement Monday: “The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is deeply troubled by today’s vote by the Boy Scouts of America National Executive Board. In spite of a request to delay the vote, it was scheduled at a time in July when members of the Church’s governing councils are out of their offices and do not meet. When the leadership of the Church resumes its regular schedule of meetings in August, the century-long association with Scouting will need to be examined. The Church has always welcomed all boys to its Scouting units regardless of sexual orientation. However, the admission of openly gay leaders is inconsistent with the doctrines of the Church and what have traditionally been the values of the Boy Scouts of America. As a global organization with members in 170 countries, the Church has long been evaluating the limitations that fully one-half of its youth face where Scouting is not available. Those worldwide needs combined with this vote by the BSA National Executive Board will be carefully reviewed by the leaders of the Church in the weeks ahead.” Under the BSA’s new policy: • Prospective employees of the national organization could no longer be denied a staff position on the basis of sexual orientation. • Gay leaders who were previously removed from Scouting because of the ban would have the opportunity to reapply for volunteer positions. • If otherwise qualified, a gay adult would be eligible to serve as a Scoutmaster or unit leader. Gates, who became the BSA’s president in May 2014, said at the time that he personally would have favored ending the ban on gay adults, but he opposed any further debate after the Scouts’ policymaking body upheld the ban. In May, however, he said that recent events “have confronted us with urgent challenges I did not foresee and which we cannot ignore.” He cited an announcement by the BSA’s New York City chapter in early April that it had hired Pascal Tessier, the nation’s first openly gay Eagle Scout, as a summer camp leader. Gates also cited broader gay-rights developments and warned that rigidly maintaining the ban “will be the end of us as a national movement.” The BSA faced potential lawsuits in New York and other states if it continued to enforce its ban, which had been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2000. Since then, the exclusionary policy has prompted numerous major corporations to suspend charitable donations to the Scouts, and has strained relations with some municipalities that cover gays in their non-discrimination codes. Stuart Upton, a lawyer for the LGBT-rights group Lambda Legal, questioned whether the BSA’s new policy to let church-sponsored units continue to exclude gay adults would be sustainable. “There will be a period of time where they’ll have some legal protection,” Upton said. “But that doesn’t mean the lawsuits won’t keep coming. ... They will become increasingly marginalized from the direction society is going.” Like several other major youth organizations, the Boy Scouts have experienced a membership decline in recent decades. Current membership, according to the BSA, is about 2.4 million boys and about 1 million adults. After the 2013 decision to admit gay youth, some conservatives split from the BSA to form a new group, Trail Life USA, which has created its own ranks, badges and uniforms. The group claims a membership of more than 25,000 youths and adults.

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  • VIDEO: Coast Guard search for teens off Florida coast

    VOLUSIA COUNTY, FL — The US Coast Guard is searching off Florida's east coast for two missing 14-year-olds who disappeared while fishing in the Atlantic Ocean. Their boat was found, capsized.

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  • Kansas brings hits and new vocalist to Layton concert

    For some, winning the rock ‘n’ roll lottery may mean getting a backstage pass to meet the band. But for Ronnie Platt, singer for Kansas, it mean evolving from a long-time fan to the front man. “I’ve sung Kansas songs my whole life in cover bands that I’ve been in over the years and so when you sing it for the actual band Kansas, it has a little more impact,” Platt said, giving the thought a full-bellied chuckle. “That’s quite the understatement.” Platt recently celebrated his one year anniversary as the lead vocalist and keyboard player for the band, which is booked at the Kenley Amphitheater in Layton Aug. 6. This time last year had someone told Platt he would be touring the world with one of his favorite bands, he’d never believe it. [image=k1] “Boy, to have looked back and to think of all the places we’ve been just in a years time, it’s really mind-boggling to me and it really has gone by in a blink of an eye because the whole episode of me getting the job came so quickly,” Platt said. “Getting confirmation that I got the job was less than a week, and that fast. You would think that something like that would be a long, drawn-out process, but, wow. It moved fast and it hasn’t slowed down one bit since.” Platt was invited to meet with the original members of Kansas in Atlanta, Georgia for a different type of audition that didn’t require any singing. “They said to me, you’re not coming down here to audition, we don’t need to hear you sing, we heard you in Shooting Star and we heard you on YouTube, we know you can sing your butt off, we’re just having you down to see how you fit it,” Platt said. “And we really do, I mean we all get along so well.” Platt likes the fast-paced rock ‘n’ roll life. Being in Kansas, he said, is like being in a band with old friends. If they’re not making music, they’re sharing laughter. “We all get along so well. It’s funny in some ways, when you’re on this job you spend a lot of time together. The on-stage part is such a small segment, we’re all in the same hotel together, we’re traveling together every day, we’re all on the same plane together so we’re constantly together,” he said. “And in some respects, it feels like I’ve always been there, you know? So it’s a good thing.” As for being in charge of creating the setlist for Kansas shows, Platt isn’t quite there yet. He’s still too big of a fan to not want to include every song in the band’s exhaustive library. “Oh, my god. I’ve always said, if I had to make the setlist, I would be in a padded room by the end of the day because there’s such a huge library,” Platt laughed. “Deep cuts that I love, of course you’ve got to do “Dust in the Wind,” of course you’ve got to do “Carry on My Wayward Son,” of course you’ve got to do “Point of No Return.” But I think if I had to make the setlist, the show would be about seven hours long.” [image=k2] Platt said the concert in Layton will include the hits for diehard fans, but over the past year Kansas has been careful about swapping out a few songs for newer ones, to satisfy everyone. “Over the past year we’ve been real careful about moving a song or two out and introducing a new song or two to satisfy us for one, and give fans variety in the show,” he said. “When we play with Boston and other huge name bands like that, you’ve got to trim your setlist down a little bit and you cut this song, or that song and it’s always depressing because it’s like, ‘oh I don’t want to cut that song! I want to do that song!’ I want to do them all. So it’s tough.” Regardless of what songs Platt sings on stage, he knows the music will have the same impact it had and continues to have on him as it will be the fans that show up. “Kansas music is just so in depth and has so much passion and is so deep, it’s really dynamic music and I think Kansas fans are the intense listeners and people who have gone to see the band for the first time or are just discovering Kansas, they experience that in-depth music,” he said. “And we’ll grab ya, and we don’t let go.” Contact reporter Raychel Johnson at 801-625-4279 or rajohnson@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter @raychelNEWS. PREVIEW WHAT: Kansas WHEN: 8 p.m. Aug. 6 WHERE: Kenley Amphitheater, 403 N Wasatch Dr. Layton TICKETS: $29/General Admission; Reserved/$49; Orchestra/$59

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  • VIDEO: Rodeo Clown John Harrison Keeps Ogden Smiling

    Rodeo clown John Harrison kept Ogden smiling all week long during the Ogden Pioneer Days Rodeo.

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  • Top 5 Headlines to Know. Now.

    Here are the top 5 stories to Know. Now. for Monday, July 27, 2015.  1. NEW DETAILS: Ogden drive-by shooting wounds 2.  Read story here.  2. 'Enough already': Anti-bullying event launched in Ogden.  Read story here.  3. Tribute to Fallen Soldiers torch ride is Utah-bound.  Read story here.  4. Centerville police arrest man in series of child molestations.  Read story here.  5. Overnight roof fire at Harrisville Rite Aid put out.  Read story here. 

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  • VIDEO: Daily News Update

    Here’s your Daily News Update for Monday, July 27, 2015 with Joan Dunn. 

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  • Judge denies captured escapee's furlough request

    BRIGHAM CITY — The walk-aways from the Box Elder County Jail recovered by police earlier this month have all been charged with new counts of escape, but that hasn't keep one from asking for a furlough from the jail. The four were all charged formally in 1st District Court last week with the third-degree felony, which could bring transfer from the county jail to the state prison. After weeks of searching, the Box Elder Sheriff's Office on July 2 announced the missing inmates on its Facebook page. Numerous newspaper and broadcast media followed with stories and all four were nabbed within a week, officials crediting traditional and social media in all four captures. The first was caught the following weekend in Box Elder County, the next two a few days later in Salt Lake City, and the last July 8 in Ogden. All had been granted work release from the jail as minor offenders, with no-bail bench warrants issued for their arrest when they failed to return to the jail in the evening. The longest on the loose was David Michael Corbett, 22, Honeyville, on the lam for almost six weeks after several theft convictions. The only absconder with prior prison time was James Dial. None of the four were violent offenders, typically with records for drug offenses and theft, with Dial, 30, formerly of Kaysville, having the longest record, dating back to 2003. Joel and Jessica Myers, husband and wife, according to court files, 27 and 25, respectively, had skipped on their work release in mid-June. Which was shortly after being sentenced on trespassing charges for breaking into Joel Myers' mother's home, his family home, in Howell and living there while she was out of town. Despite the new charges, Corbett asked for a jail furlough, saying his wife is expecting. She is scheduled to deliver twins at the Brigham City Community Hospital this week, according to Corbett's furlough request motion filed with 1st District Judge Tom Willmore. Willmore simply wrote the word "denied" on his order issued Wednesday, rejecting the furlough request. Problematic is the fact that in sentencing Corbett in April on theft charges, Willmore had ordered him not to associate with the woman. She, like Corbett, has numerous theft convictions in Box Elder County, court records show.

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  • Adams Avenue construction nightmare nears end

    WASHINGTON TERRACE — Light beckons at the end of the tunnel of orange cones that have lined Adams Avenue in various configurations since last summer. But impacts from the $5.3 million road-widening project have extended well beyond frustrated drivers. According to Washington Terrace City Manager Tom Hanson, the road upgrades should conclude by mid-August. Hanson acknowledged that the project fell behind schedule and cost more than its bid amount — but even with a pile of change orders, it still falls within budget, he said. “There is a lot of infrastructure inside and underneath Adams,” including gas and culinary water lines, fiber-optic cable and storm drains, Hanson said. “And all of it has to be protected or strategically moved.” Hanson empathized with those who live or work near the construction area. “As far as living through a project like this where you’re doing infrastructure such as curb, gutter and sidewalk, it’s like being awake during your own surgery,” Hanson said. “It’s a bad experience and it hurts.” However, he believes the end result will benefit everyone. “We know we’ve impacted every business along that route,” whether it be the coffee shop inside the Pleasant Valley Library or a heart attack traveling to Ogden Regional Medical Center. There have been a few recent casualties — namely, four special American elm trees purposefully planted in front of the library that had to be removed earlier this week. And Bean-A-Colada, the privately owned cafe inside the library, is nearing the need for life support, according to Weber County Library Director Lynnda Wangsgard. Patronage of library events has also fallen off due to lack of handicapped access and confusion as to how to access the facility’s parking lots and whether it is even open. [gmap=41.162805, -111.967901] “We know from numbers who attend our programs that our traffic is way down,” Wangsgard said. “Last year we had a fantastic comic book convention here, between 2,500 to 3,000 attended that day. This year it was around 1,000.” Kevin Wilson, the Weber County Library system’s professional property manager, voiced liability concerns associated with the tangled approach into the Pleasant Valley branch. “A school brought some kids over and were so concerned about the road construction and lack of access that they called the police department and had them block off the road for them to cross,” Wilson said. “Pile that with trying to get a handicapped person who doesn’t move well for whatever reason into the building and the risk is huge.” Wangsgard lamented the loss of the American elm trees in the library’s front park strip, noting that a written agreement included in the construction bid said they should be protected. Weber County Library Director Lynnda Wangsgard stands by one of the trees that are now inches away from the curb along Adams Avenue. American elms, more common in the northeastern United States, shade Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House. Their numbers nationwide have declined due to Dutch elm disease, but some disease-tolerant varieties have proven to be more hardy. Plaques recognized sponsors who had helped fund Pleasant Valley’s American elms and Wangsgard fought to save them. “We’ve been careful to select trees and look at how they’re going to mature and how we can manage them,” Wangsgard said, noting that the Pleasant Valley branch is a LEED-certified energy-efficient facility designed to have an arboretum that includes an Arctic Blue Willow that helps filter petroleum out of parking lot runoff. The other 50 to 70 tree varieties include some that flower and some that produce nuts and berries. Washington Terrace’s Hanson said they’d discussed the American elms for four years. “We ended with challenges with alignment and the height of curb and gutter, and the library board was not comfortable with what we’ve been able to do with dirt around the trees,” Hanson said. “So we’ll replace the existing trees with Chinese elms that they like, and Washington Terrace will pick up the cost.” A July 13 agreement between the city and library outlined tree removal and replacement, and also detailed how driveway approaches into the facility would be completed to restore access, proper storm water drainage and aesthetic appeal. “There was no way to accommodate the trees, so we’re stepping aside and letting them take them out rather than struggling to keep them alive,” Wangsgard said, adding that she anticipates the library being put back together to accommodate patrons “in a reasonable amount of time.” Hanson said the project should “button up” in the next two to three weeks and the Chinese elms will get planted when the weather cools this fall to boost their chances of survival. Contact reporter Cathy McKitrick at 801-625-4214 or cmckitrick@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter at @catmck.

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  • Ogden wins $50K grant for Jefferson arts hub

    OGDEN — Ogden City will receive a $50,000 award from the National Endowment for the Arts to support development of an Ogden Arts Hub and associated creative campus in the Jefferson Arts District. The Our Town grant program supports creative placemaking projects that help to transform communities into lively, beautiful and resilient places with the arts at their core. Ogden’s arts hub will house arts organizations, support arts education and outreach, and provide resources to artists, makers and entrepreneurs. The project will also include professional development for local artists. The project is a partnership between Ogden City, Weber Arts Council, UNION Industrial Coworking (a creative makerspace), and other stakeholders. “Ogden City demonstrates the best in creative community development and (its) work will have a valuable impact on its community,” said Endowment Chairman Jane Chu in a prepared statement. “Through Our Town funding, arts organizations continue to spark vitality that support neighborhoods and public spaces, enhancing a sense of place for residents and visitors alike.” “We are thrilled to have been selected to receive this prestigious award,” said Mayor Mike Caldwell. “The Our Town funding will support arts in Ogden as well as community development, and both will in turn contribute to the development of an emerging arts district and the ongoing revitalization of our East Central neighborhoods.” [gmap=41.218891, -111.964579]

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  • VIDEO: Fire erupts at Vegas hotel swimming pool

    A fire at a hotel swimming pool that sent large plumes of black smoke high above the Las Vegas Strip appears to be under control. Clark County Fire Chief Greg Cassell says it took firefighters about 30 minutes to gain control of the blaze that broke out Saturday on the 14th floor of The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas hotel. Cassell says one person was taken to a hospital with minor injuries. The fire was first reported around 12:15 p.m. Cassell says the hotel was evacuated, but it's not clear if any guests will be displaced. The fire started at an outside area, setting pool cabanas and trees ablaze. The cause of the fire has not been determined. Heavy smoke was visible to people walking along the Strip.

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