• Top 5 Headlines to Know. Now.

    Here are the top 5 stories to Know. Now. for Tuesday, August 4, 2015.  1. Ogden man arrested for allegedly raping 12-year-old.  Read story here.  2. Roy dancer struts her stuff in next round of 'SYTYCD.’  Read story here.  3. Reclaiming the inner city one house at a time.  Read story here.  4. Reijnen claims opening stage win at Tour of Utah.  Read story here.  5. Judge dismisses lawsuit against North Ogden PD.  Read story here. 

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  • VIDEO: Daily News Update

    Here’s your Daily News Update for Tuesday, August 4, 2015 with Joan Dunn. 

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  • Third annual F2TF 5k brings nearly 1,500 participants

    OGDEN – The 2015 “Fight to the Finish” theme “Together” brought nearly 1,500 people -- in 34 teams -- together to support loved ones who are either fighting illness or have passed away. Ann Smith started the memorial 5k race, Saturday at Weber State University, to connect with others who are also facing difficult trials. Smith’s son Tyler passed away in 2012 at age 15 after a one year battle with liver cancer. “I’m doing what Tyler expects me to do,” Smith said. One of Tyler’s final wishes was to not let others forget about him and his fight. Smith feels the F2TF now comes to really “mean something to people.” With almost 1,500 contributors, the 5k race raised almost $30,000. The money will benefit the Giving Tree donations to help families in need. Nearly all the teams running in the event were once recipients of the Giving Tree. Smith received a Giving Tree, a tree planted in her yard that blooms every spring, to remind her of her son. They put quotes, cards, and money on the tree to help families in need. Since Tyler’s death 150 families have been recipients of a Giving Tree. Smith recalls how her son’s life impacted all those around him. “It really impacted the kids (Tyler’s friends) and put their lives in a different perspective,” Smith said. “A mom doesn’t want that forgotten.” “I could complain, but it wouldn’t change my situation,” Tyler said before he passed. “I can be happy and be sick or just be sick. I choose to be happy.” [image=F2TF event 2] During a family vacation to Universal Studios, made possible because of the Make a Wish Foundation, the Smith family captured a photo that encompassed Tyler’s positivity. Smith describes the photo as “everyone screaming or taking cover, but Tyler is just calming smiling, enjoying the ride.” She has continued her son’s positive legacy by paying forward support she received during Tyler’s fight. Becky Anderson, the executive director of Anything for a Friend, spoke at the event. She overcame her own fight with breast cancer after doctors diagnosed the disease in December 2010. Her sister started the first fundraiser for her at that time, which lead to many more future fundraisers. “All I could think was to pay it forward,” Anderson said. Anderson focused on the “Together” theme and asked all participants to link arms to symbolize their connection. She asked participants to think why they came. “I am here to fill a commitment that I made to a 15-year-old (Tyler),” Anderson said. Her commitment was to never forget him. “If you are here for a dead-dog 5k you might be in the wrong place,” Anderson said. “If you are here to feel a healing balm in your heart, you might be in the right place.” Smith agreed that the F2TF is not a normal 5k race. “It’s walking the race and honoring all these people,” Smith said. The event set up posters for each team. The poster included a picture of the person the team was running for and a short description of their fight. Smith explained that doing these events helps “fill the hole of not having Ty here.” The teams help others to see they are not alone in the difficulties they go through. Lindsay Page, who is married with four small children, had one of the largest teams in the race with 89 runners all wearing the “Team Lindsay” logo. Page first noticed issues with her spleen in November 2014. Since then she started chemotherapy in February, the same time she became a Giving Tree recipient, and finished the six month chemotherapy process last week. “This was also a celebration of my end to chemotherapy as well as a huge show of support for me and my family,” Page said. She feels the events help encourage her to talk with people who are going through similar things. “It’s hard to lose your hair,” she said. “But it’s good to have people you can talk to about it.” Team Jedd ran for a 5-year-old boy who found out he had cancer last year on Mother’s Day. Traci Hansen, Jedd’s mother, said these events “help you to realize that no one fights alone.” This was their first time running in the T2FT 5k race. They became involved after another team, T-Bone, nominated them for the Giving Tree last Christmas. Jedd is now getting ready to start kindergarten this year. The F2TF started a new butterfly release tradition this year. Anderson describes one of the final conversations Smith had with her son Tyler. After telling his mom he was excited to pass to the other side because he would know what she taught him about faith, God, Christ, and eternal families is true. She then required him to tell her once he knew by giving her the sign of a butterfly. Days after Tyler passed, Smith and her family sat discussing his life outside when a monarch butterfly landed on their table. The butterfly release honors that experience. “Think of the things that symbolize hope for you. Things that are bigger than your pain,” Anderson said speaking of Smith’s butterfly symbol. They continued an old tradition with Casey Elliot singing “Go the Distance” from Disney’s Hercules. Smith feels the lyrics “A hero’s welcome waiting for you” describes the homecoming these “warriors” receive upon passing. “My hope is that someone’s heart can heal. I know that despair,” Smith said. “We’ve been there. I see it in their face, my hope is that they go away with just a little more peace and hope and healing.”

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  • Utah cities collect $25 of every $1,000 earned by residents

    SALT LAKE CITY — As cities and counties throughout Utah consider raising property and sales taxes this year, a tax watchdog group released a report Monday looking at how much residents already pay through taxes and fees. City governments scoop up an average of $25 per $1,000 earned by residents, according to the report from the Utah Taxpayers Association. The city of South Salt Lake had the most expensive government in 2014, taking $64.26 of each $1,000 earned in the city, according to the report. Riverton, a city 16 miles away in Salt Lake County, was the cheapest, taking $9.71 of each $1,000 earned. Ogden collected about $39.89 for every $1,000 earned by its residents, while St. George collected about $33.48 and Provo took in $30.79 per $1,000 earned. Billy Hesterman, the vice president of the Utah Taxpayers Association, said the group is urging residents to use the report as a “snapshot” of what they’re already paying for when they weigh whether tax hikes are needed this year. “It’s important the taxpayers understand how much their city is spending and what that means to them in their daily lives,” Hesterman said. “Taxpayers need to remind city officials that the money they are spending is money that is taken right out of the family’s budget.” At a news conference Monday, Hesterman acknowledged that the data takes a broad look at city taxes and fees without comparing the various city services they pay for. For example, South Salt Lake City has its own police and fire department. Riverton does not have its own public safety departments and instead offers police and fire services through a contract with Salt Lake County’s Unified Fire Authority and Unified Police Department. Hesterman said that while public safety programs are essential, his group feels that cities should look at trimming budgets elsewhere and privatizing non-essential services such as providing dog parks and swimming pools. “If it’s found in the Yellowbook, it’s something that government shouldn’t be doing,” Hesterman said. The organization released the report as more than a dozen cities begin holding public hearings this week on plans to hike property taxes. Utah’s Truth in Taxation law allows residents to voice their opinions on the increases at the hearings before the rates are finalized. Many cities, particularly along the heavily-populated Wasatch Front, are also pushing for a sales tax increase this year in their respective counties. A law passed earlier this year allows counties to ask voters to consider a .25 percent sales tax increase to help pay for local transportation needs. City budgets will scoop up a portion of what’s collected. Counties will decide by mid-August if they’ll put the issue before voters in November.

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  • VIDEO: Northern Living

    On today’s show Joan shows you how to make a whiteboard calendar and Angie heads to Station Park in Farmington to talk to the Detail Sharks.  Tips & Tricks for Joan’s whiteboard calendar: I used 4- 12X12 pieces of whiteboard vinyl. I felt like it was easier to put four separate pieces on the fridge rather than one large piece. However, I still had a heck of a time getting the vinyl to not bunch or bubble. Seriously, how do you get vinyl to lay smooth....it was so hard!! In the tutorial she made magnets for her numbers....i just made some magnets to hold things and drew on my numbers with a dry erase marker. I felt like it looks less cluttered like that. Although, the number magnets are cute! I made the Month thought bubble with chalkboard vinyl, that way you can erase it and write the new month on there when it changes. The homework chart for my daughter was also chalkboard vinyl. The check-list includes getting your homework done, getting your backpack ready for the next day, reading for 20 mins, laying out your clothes the night before, and getting to bed on time. The five boxes on the bottom of the chart are for Mom and Dad. If you get five check marks, it means you've done you chart for the whole week and you get a treat or a prize! In the tutorial they also put magnets on a calculator, ruler, and put all sorts of school supplies on the fridge. I didn't do that, but it is a handy place to keep those supplies and your kids know just where to find everything. Good luck this year, and let me know in the comments how you smooth the vinyl! Seriously!! http://www.the36thavenue.com/make-a-white-board-magnetic-calendar/     Northern Living is a weekly lifestyle show hosted by Joan Dunn and Angie Erickson and features what is going on in Northern Utah. If you have a story idea, email Angie at aerickson@standard.net or Joan at jodunn@standard.net.

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  • Skydivers create largest ever vertical formation

    Traveling at speeds of up to 240 mph, 164 skydivers flying head-down built the largest ever vertical skydiving formation Friday over central Illinois, smashing the previous record. (July 31)

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  • Top 5 Headlines to Know. Now.

    Here are the top 5 stories to Know. Now. for Monday, August 3, 2015.  1. Backpacks, school supplies offered to those in need.  Read story here.  2. Economic impact of Harmons-Ridley's deal debated.  Read story here.  3. Woman still not competent for trial in child stranglings.  Read story here.  4. Woman remembered for never giving up on local youth.  Read story here.  5. 21 on 21: Layton players need to keep getting along.  Read story here. 

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  • VIDEO: Daily News Update

    Here’s your Daily News Update for Monday, August 3, 2015 with Joan Dunn. 

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  • Economic impact of Harmons-Ridley's deal debated

    OGDEN — In the dark with everyone else, city officials hope the recently announced Harmons-Ridley’s transaction will preserve the retail economy in the Five Points area. Harmons in September will leave its Five Points store and Ridley’s will move in. Ridley’s also owns Wangsgard’s, across the street. Will Ridley’s keep both stores open? “To my knowledge, they (Ridley’s) haven’t talked to anyone at the city,” Ogden City Chief Administrative Officer Mark Johnson said. Ridley’s has yet to apply for a business license for the Harmons location. The company acquired a business license for the Wangsgards store site this spring, according to officials. The Harmons move raises questions not only for customers and employees of the stores, but the flow of sales tax revenue to the affected cities, especially Ogden. “We’re being caught off guard on this too,” Johnson said Some city officials speculate that Ridley’s will keep the Wangsgards name on that property, while placing the Ridley’s name on the Harmons store. Harrisville City Administrator Bill Morris confirmed he has heard similar rumors. But whether the two locally owned grocery stores are victims of big-box stores like Walmart, one of which that has been located about a mile down the road in Harrisville for about eight years, would be guess work. “I don’t know that we have any proof,” Johnson said regarding the idea that the Walmart in Harrisville could be siphoning customers and sales away from the Five Points markets. “Logically, it would make sense that the Harrisville Walmart must have impacted Harmons and Wangsgards.” But Utah law protects the privacy of private organizations’ tax records, so such a claim would be difficult to document. Johnson said even if he could pull individual sales tax information to look into that idea, it would be against the law for him to release it. Ogden Community and Economic Development Director Tom Christopulos said he too is curious about what Ridley’s is going to do with two grocery stores in such close proximity of each other. But Christopulos discounted the notion that the Walmart in Harrisville had anything to do with Harmons leaving, based on earlier conversations he had with store officials. Harmons officials talked to Ogden officials 18 months ago about its Five Points remodeling project, in which the store was planning to going “up-market” to reach a new, more affluent customer base, Christopulos said. Other Harmons stores have gone up-market, he said, “and they tried to do it at this store, and couldn’t get the market to follow. “Harmons recently remodeled (the store). It’s been a good market. It is just not where they are going.” Morris said the Harrisville Walmart has enjoyed consistent customer traffic. And even had Harmons or Wangsgards experienced a drain of business, Morris said it may have been a result of the Walmart store at 20th Sreet and Wall Avenue in Ogden, rather than the one in Harrisville. “We were worried the Walmart on 20th would siphon off of our Walmart in Harrisville,” Morris said. “So far,” Morris said, that does not appear to be the case. But the Harrisville Walmart does have to contend with the new Smith’s Marketplace store that recently opened at 2700 North in North Ogden. “They are all my favorites,” Utah Food Industry Association and Utah Retail Merchants Association vice president Kate Bradshaw said of the stores in question. Bradshaw declined to speak about Ridley’s or Harmons, or if big-box stores are hurting local grocers’ customer base. Walmart and Harmons are both members of the Utah Retail Merchants Association, while Harmons and Wangsgards are members of the Utah Food Industry Association, a sister organization to the merchants group, Bradshaw said. Ridley’s, which operates stores in Morgan and in Tremonton, is not a member of either organization, Bradshaw said. Johnson said he hopes Ridley’s keeps both the Harmons and Wangsgards stores open. Ridley’s would have to change the name of the Harmons store, he said, but he wondered if they might keep the other store operating under the Wangsgards name. “It is always sad when you lose choices and options,” Ogden Mayor Mike Caldwell said of the ongoing consolidation of grocery stores. “We would love to see Harmons have a continued presence in Ogden,” he said. Harmons also has stores in Roy and Farmington and more in Salt Lake and Utah counties. Reporter Becky Wright contributed to this report.    

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  • 16-year-old West Jordan girl killed in crash

    MILLARD COUNTY —  A 16-year-old West Jordan girl was killed in a rollover on I-15 near Fillmore early Sunday morning. According to the Utah Highway Patrol at 2:35 a.m., a 2014 Toyota 4 Runner, driven by 38-year-old Monica Rodriguez from West Jordan, was traveling north on I-15 near mile post 143. The road gradually curves to the right, however, the vehicle continued in a straight line and off the left side of the roadway. The driver steered sharply to the right, causing the car to begin sliding towards its left side. The vehicle began to roll just prior to coming back onto the paved portion of the road. It rolled multiple times before coming to a rest on its side. The driver’s 16-year-old daughter, Stephanie Villegas, had removed her seat belt in order to lie across the back seat and was ejected and landed near the center line of the northbound lanes. A second vehicle, unaware of the accident, drove into the scene and began slowing as they encountered debris in the roadway. This second vehicle, being unaware of the female lying in the middle of roadway, struck the victim. Passersby began offering aid to the victim but she passed away at the scene. Drowsy driving is suspected as a contributing factor of the crash. The victims father, Enrique Villegas, 41, was also a passenger in the vehicle. He and his wife were transported by ground ambulance to Fillmore Community Medical with non-life threatening injuries.

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  • Woman still not competent for trial in child stranglings

    FARMINGTON --- A 49-year-old Layton woman accused of strangling her two children to death will continue to receive treatment at the Utah State Hospital, almost five years after the crime.  A hearing to review the mental competency of Sun Cha Warhola had been scheduled for Friday in 2nd District Court. It was canceled on Tuesday and another hearing is scheduled for Jan. 8, according to the court docket.  Her attorney, Ed Brass, said in an email to the Standard-Examiner on Friday that Warhola “has been determined to be incompetent every time this has been reviewed, which is every six months. The State Hospital has concluded she is delusional and as a result cannot assist her attorneys, Ms. Cordova and me, in her defense. I cannot speculate what would happen at a trial. Unless she becomes competent, which seems increasingly unlikely given the passage of time, she may never have a trial.” Warhola is charged with two counts of aggravated murder. On Sept. 8, 2010, police found the woman’s two children James, 8, and Jean, 7, dead in their Layton home. Kenneth Warhola, the children’s father, had arrived earlier that day to find Sun Cha Warhola barricaded inside their son’s room at their home in Layton. The two children were inside the room but Kenneth Warhola was not able to get into the room, police said. He called police from a neighbor’s home and police found the children covered with blankets and strangulation marks around their necks. [gmap=41.091811, -111.903667] Warhola was sent to the state hospital in 2011 for treatment to restore mental competency in order to stand trial.  Deputy Davis County Attorney Brandon Poll said Utah law allows prosecutors another 18 months before they have to make a decision concerning the direction of the case.  Poll said the medical staff at the hospital will let the attorneys know if Warhola’s mental competency has been restored before the next court hearing. “They just won’t let her sit down there,” Poll said.  Warhola’s mental competency has to be restored before she can enter any type of plea, attorneys said.  Contact reporter Loretta Park at 801-625-4252 or lpark@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter at @LorettaParkSE. Like her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SELorettaPark.

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  • VIDEO: Dance craze 'Watch Me' song gives Silento a breakthrough

    Silento, the 17-year-old rapper who's having a pop culture moment with the dance craze to his debut song titled “Watch Me”, says he wants to be a role model to the young kids who have posted videos dancing to his tune. 

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