• Photography Fourth: How to take sparkler photos

    Want to get festive Fourth of July photos without the big firework show crowds? Try these at-home sparkler photos. From pro gear equipment to fun iPhone apps, we’ve got you covered. Pro gear: What you need: sparklers (for this photo we used jumbo sparklers, but regular ones work just as well), camera with timer capabilities on a tripod, a strobe on a stand at a 45-degree angle, a lighter, and someone cute to kiss. (If you are missing the last element, grab the first cutie you see and tell them that you need them to volunteer for “art purposes.”) I set the camera on a 10-second timer with a four-second exposure. I’d light the sparklers and hand them to my “for art purposes” volunteer. I would then push the shutter button, run over to my volunteer and get into a #BrinsonBanksing type pose. We’d align our sparklers above our heads. When the shutter would open the flash would fire and we knew that we had four seconds to make a heart. A few tries and, voila, we made this photo. iPhone: What you need: sparklers, a hand to hold them, a smart phone with the following apps: Long Exposure Camera PRO $1.99 Image Blender $2.99 Videoshop $1.99 AfterLight $0.99 I love all four apps for sparkler fun, but Videoshop was my favorite. It allowed me to speed up or slow down recorded video and even stylize the finish product. Sparklers in slow motion and stop motion was really cool. Check out the filtered stop-motion video online. With Image Blender I had one photograph of a hand holding a sparkler and layered it four times, expanding it a little each time. I then brought it into AfterLight and hiked up the contrast, took down the saturation, added a vignette and played with the brightness and contrast again before saving it to my camera roll. With Long Exposure Camera PRO I could adjust the light sensitivity, capture mode and shutter speed. I used bulb to start and stop the shutter when I chose. My lovely volunteer drew a simple circle around his face and I exported the photograph. I brought it into AfterLight and brought up the brightness and contrast, added a “captain” filter and brought the shadows down before exporting. All-in-all the possibilities are endless. I look forward to the wonderful photos you capture and recreate!

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  • Ex-CNN anchor, husband survive hotel gun fight

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — A cross-country road trip got derailed for a former CNN anchor and her husband after a would-be robber forced his way into their motel room and a shootout ensued. Lynne Russell told reporters Wednesday that her husband, Chuck de Caro, decided to stop at a Motel 6 on Albuquerque’s western edge because they were tired after a long day of traveling. When she went out to the car to get something and returned to the room, a man was at the door with a handgun. “He pushed me into the room and that’s when my husband came out of the shower and saw what was happening,” Russell told Albuquerque station KOB-TV. “We tried to calm him, confuse him and do everything we could do to just come out of it in one piece.” After grabbing her husband’s briefcase, the man started shooting at de Caro. Russell ducked behind the furniture and de Caro fired back, hitting the man. The robber was killed and de Caro was wounded. “It was a gun battle, and Chuck was bleeding heavily, but he didn’t stop firing because the man was firing on him,” Russell told The New York Post. In a telephone interview with The Associated Press, Russell said her husband was shot three times and was recovering at a hospital but she did not immediately know his condition. “He’s in a lot of pain,” she said. “He took three shots, including a couple to the abdomen. But magically, his organs were not affected. "He’s my hero. He saved my life,” Russell added. Albuquerque police did not release names of those involved, and a spokesman, Officer Tanner Tixier, said it appeared to be a random robbery attempt. “They weren’t targeted for who they were,” Tixier said. “We believe the offender didn’t realize the victim’s husband was in the motel (room). He believed he had an easy target. That turned out not to be the case obviously.” Russell said the shooting happened four days into the couple’s trip. Russell was a prominent figure in CNN’s groundbreaking foray into around-the-clock news, serving as an anchor from 1983 to 2001. She was one of the first anchors hired at CNN Headline News, then called CNN 2, after it went on the air in 1982. Ted Kavanau, a manager for CNN at its founding and founding president of CNN Headline news, said Russell told him the robber staggered out of the room. Police officers responding to a report of shots fired found the body in a parking lot. A former special forces officer, de Caro said he called upon his training to protect his wife. “I was determined to save my dream girl’s life — even if it cost my own,” he told The Post. Both de Caro and Russell have concealed carry licenses.

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  • SE Music Scoop for Friday, July 3, 2015

    Local bluesman Ryan Hawthorn is a guitarist and quite the craftsman when it comes to electric pedals and amps. In this episode of SE Music Scoop, Hawthorn discusses his love for guitar, his band Pinetop Inferno, and gigging with his daughter.  Contact reporter Raychel Johnson at 801-625-4279 or rajohnson@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter @raychelNEWS.

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  • VIDEO: Daily News Update

    In today’s Daily News Update a man is killed in a head-on collision plus July 4 event planners want to help people beat the heat and Layton City offers free WiFi at parks.

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  • AG's Office releases 911 call of officer-related shooting

    SALT LAKE CITY  — The state has released the 911 call that led to Thomas Hamby’s fatal Jan. 8 shooting by police. After an investigation, the Utah Attorney General’s Office cleared Syracuse Police Officer Jennifer Walker, Davis County Sheriff’s Deputy Joshua McEwen and Deputy Neil Major in February. In the 911 call, released Tuesday, the caller said she needed an officer at her Syracuse home.  “He’s mad at me because I took his guns and hid them,” said the woman, later identified as Hamby’s girlfriend. “I need someone here right now.”   [gmap=41.081686, -112.083892] The Attorney General’s Office also released on Wednesday video footage from dash cameras and body cameras from several officers, including Davis County Sheriff’s deputies. The footage did not show the shooting, but officers could be heard looking for Hamby.  Several police agencies, including Kaysville, Davis County Sheriff’s Office and Clearfield, responded to the 911 call that evening and assisted Syracuse police. A day after the Attorney General’s Office ruled the shooting justified, Syracuse Police Department released footage from a body camera worn by Syracuse Officer Robert Gullien. It begins with the sound of a woman screaming and a volley of gunshots. “He’s going to kill me if you keep asking me questions. Get here right now,” the woman told the Davis County Sheriff’s dispatcher in the 911 call released Wednesday. Hamby had a shotgun, the woman said.  The woman said she was hiding behind a garbage can at a neighbor’s home and she could hear Hamby yelling “like he’s looking for me.”  Toward the end of the call, she warned the dispatcher, “All (the police officers are) going to do is aggravate him. I just want them to protect me.”  She goes on to say, “Once they’re here, I want to talk to him and get him to listen to me. He’ll listen to me and not to them.”  In a document released by the Attorney General’s Office in February, police said they saw Hamby exit the front door of his home with a weapon pointed in the firing position at one of the officers. The officer commanded the man to drop the gun and show his hands. All three officers, along with several witnesses, said Hamby fired his gun first, prompting the officers to return fire, according to the report. Hamby fell to the ground within the threshold of the front door. He was airlifted to University of Utah Medical Center, where he died. The Standard-Examiner submitted a Jan. 9 Government Records Access and Management Act request to the Davis County Sheriff’s office, requesting video and audio recordings from dash cameras, body cameras and 911 calls. That request was forwarded to the Attorney General’s Office two weeks later.  Normally, the Davis County Attorney’s Office handles the reviews of officer-involved shootings in Davis County, unless there is a conflict of interest. Deputy Davis County Attorney Steve Major is the father of Deptuty Neil Major. Government agencies have 10 business days to respond to GRAMA requests.  Assistant Attorney General Blaine Fergusen sent several emails to the Standard-Examiner extending the deadline. The “Office is currently processing a large number of records requests, and it will not be possible to respond to your request,” Fergusen wrote in several of the emails.  In the email this week announcing the release of the 911 call and other footage,  Fergusen said his office segregated audio and video of the incident that was deemed private. Hamby’s sister, Linda Bailey, was critical of how the police handled the incident. She said in January that prescription painkillers her brother received following a surgery a few days prior to the shooting appeared to make him hallucinate. A search warrant filed in 2nd District Court reveals more about what happened that night and what officers found once they entered the home.  The 911 call came in at 6:44 p.m. and the first officers on the scene arrived at 6:47 p.m. According to the court document, officers could hear the “suspect yelling inside the home.”  Then at 6:55 p.m. “the suspect opened the front door pointing a shotgun out the door at the direction of the officers,” according to the document.  At 7:02 p.m. shots were fired. Items confiscated from the home included a 12-gauge shotgun, two black-powder rifles, two rifles and a Ruger handgun. The affidavit also lists a quantity of ammunition, plus prescription medication that included tramadol, a pain killer, and alprazolam, an anti-anxiety medication.  Contact reporter Loretta Park at 801-625-4252 or lpark@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter at @LorettaParkSE. Like her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SELorettaPark.

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  • July 4 event planners want to help people beat the heat

    Clearfield City is making a few adjustments to its Fourth of July celebration this year, because of the heat. “The Parks Department is working on misters,” said Natalee Flynn, special events coordinator. “We're going to see how many they can put together.” The misters, made of pipe, create a fine, cooling spray of water for people to walk under. They'll be placed at Fisher Park, at 934 S. 1000 East, where many of Clearfield's Independence Day events take place. “We've done that only once before, in the 11 years I've worked at the Fourth of July celebration,” she said. The schedule of events has also changed this year. The annual 5k run/2 mile walk and parade will be held the morning of July 4, as usual. The change is for activities at Fisher Park, which include inflatable toys, vendors, and live entertainment. “We're starting later in the day, so it's not an all-day thing,” Flynn said. In the past, park activities started at 2 p.m., to pack a lot of fun into one day. This year the fun doesn't start until 6 p.m., and is being spread over two days Friday and Saturday. “We just feel like more people come out in the cool of the day, once the sun starts setting a little bit,” Flynn said. Event-goers are encouraged to set up umbrellas for shade, as well. [image=Layton Liberty Days parade 2014] Clearfield City will follow Davis County Health Department guidelines for mass gatherings. “If anybody comes to us with overheating or heat exhaustion, we'll have a first-aid station,” she said, noting that there will be personnel from the North Davis Fire District and an ambulance on hand. “We'll have running water, so if people bring their water bottles they can go there and fill them up,” she added. “Of course, we'll have bottled water for sale.” Staying hydrated is key to staying healthy on a hot day. “Having hydration prior to going out, and then doing whatever you're going to do, is a very wonderful preparedness thing,” said Doug Bitton, public information officer for the Layton City Fire Department, adding that people should also carry water with them to drink throughout the day. Layton's paramedics often treat cases of heat stress during the city's annual Liberty Days Celebration. “We do have calls, whether it's through the parade routes with people participating in the parade, or during the afternoon hours in our parks area,” Bitton said. They're anticipating a higher volume of calls this year because of the prolonged heat, but are prepared. “We've increased our staffing, like we do normally every year, and we'll have medical carts going around and dispatched to various locations if there are problems of people with heat stress,” he said, adding that there will be a first aid station established. First aid is also a priority at Huntsville's Independence Day celebration. “We have some good medical people who will be at the Fourth of July event,” said Max Ferre’, of the town council. “We also have help from the police department and paramedics.” The main event is held in the park, which has water fountains and shade, but planners try to get people to spend some time indoors by hosting events at the nearby LDS church building. “There's a program, and a play like a melodrama, going on in there,” Ferre’ said. Willard's July 4 event also features an afternoon melodrama performance at a local church. “We're thinking that might get people out of the heat, instead of staying in the park all day,” said Marjorie Ross, chairwoman for the Fourth of July committee. People had become overheated at past celebrations, Ross said, so the committee did away with wooden booths in favor of canopies to promote better air flow. This year Ross plans on posting signs about where first aid is available. “We had someone last year, right outside the fire department, who didn't know where to get help,” she said. Ross is also planning to take a large cooler of water for event volunteers, and to keep an eye on them to make sure they're drinking enough. “We have a water slide there, usually powered by a fireman's hose, and I'm thinking it wouldn't be hard to redirect that for a while,” she said, thinking about ways to cool off event participants. Kaysville City's fire department helps people cool off after the July 4 parade. The parade starts at 11 a.m., so the sun is overhead by the time it ends. Folks who choose to stay along the parade route get a soaking from fire truck hoses, and are invited to squirt back with their own water guns. Bitton said Layton's Surf-N-Swim is a great place to cool off. Whether cities have special plans to deal with this year's heat wave, or are just treating it like any other hot July 4, officials say the best way for celebrants to stay healthy is to do their best to take care of themselves. “Be sure to stay hydrated. Be wise on going outside. Wear light-colored clothing,” Bitton said. “The biggest thing is to recognize heat stress. If you're starting to get dizzy, or to just get too hot, it's time to cool down and seek shelter or shade.” Bitton had one other word of warning about the heat. “The ones most highly susceptible are usually the elderly, as well as the young, so we really have to pay close attention to age groups like that and make sure there are plenty of accommodations for them,” he said. “The other special group out there is our animals.” Contact reporter Becky Wright at 801-625-4274 or bwright@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter at @ReporterBWright.

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  • Top 5 Headlines to Know. Now.

    Here are the Top 5 Headlines to Know. Now. 1. It's open: Riders eating up Lagoon's Cannibal. Read story here. 2. Victim of fatal head-on collision identified. Read story here. 3. AG's Office releases 911 call of officer-related shooting. Read story here.  4. Police looking for SUV involved in hit-and-run. Read story here.  5. Successful high school basketball coach passes away. Read story here. 

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  • UPDATE: Victim of fatal head-on collision identified

    CORINNE -- A 28-year-old man is dead after a head-on collision with a semitrailer Thursday morning. The accident occurred at about 9 a.m. on Highway 13 at mile post 7, according to a release from the Utah Highway Patrol. The victim was driving a green Subaru Legacy, going eastbound near the Bear River Bridge when it crossed over into the westbound lane of traffic, directly into the path of a semi-trailer, according to the release. The two vehicles collided, causing the Subaru to spin out and the semi-trailer to jack-knife and go off road. The driver of the Subaru, who was not wearing a seat belt, was said to have died instantly, according to the release. The driver and passenger of the semi-trailer were not injured.  The driver was identified as Jordan R. Hales of Willard. The driver and passenger of the semitrailer are from Kentucky, and the trailer was empty. Both lanes of traffic were blocked for at least three hours while troopers canvased the scene.  Police are still investigating the reason why the Subaru crossed over into the opposite side of the road and looking into the possibility of intoxication or fatigue. Contact reporter Andreas Rivera at 801-625-4227 or arivera@standard.net. Follow him on Twitter at @SE_Andreas.

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  • Farmington officials test ride Lagoon's Cannibal

    FARMINGTON — Rather than use weighted crash dummies, it was Farmington city elected leaders and staff who took Lagoon’s new $22 million Cannibal for a test ride. “It redefines the term test dummy,” Farmington City Manager Dave Millheim said of the experience. Lagoon officials recently invited the Farmington City Council and staff to take a test ride on the Cannibal, a 208-feet tall roller coaster that opened to regular riders for the first time Thursday afternoon. “It was an incredible ride. It scared the bejeebers out of me,” Millheim said. But no city staff or elected city leaders cried as a result of the ride, he said. [gmap=40.987336, -111.892061] “The mayor (Jim Talbot) screamed like a baby,” said Millheim, who rode the ride twice. “I think everyone should do it once.” But according to Talbot, it was Millheim who screamed. “That was Millheim,” Talbot said with a laugh after being told what Millheim had said about him. But he admits, the ride was intense. “The ride is worth every penny. This is a grand slam for Lagoon,” he said. Millheim said what he enjoyed about the ride was how smooth it ran, and how it didn’t provide any jerking motions. “I think it is going to be an incredible producer for them,” Millheim said. “It is a very unique roller coaster.” The scariest part of the ride for him, Millheim said, was the first hill. “That first fall, you can’t see the track,” he said. And even though city leaders and staff were taking the Cannibal for a test ride, Millheim said, “he felt totally safe.” “Obviously it is an important ride for Lagoon,” he said. Contact reporter Bryon Saxton at 801-625-4244 or bsaxton@standard.net. Follow him on Twitter at @BryonSaxton.

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  • UPDATE: One man dead following head-on collision

    CORINNE -- The Utah Highway Patrol confirmed that a head-on collision Thursday morning on Highway 13 was fatal. Police and emergency vehicles are on the scene of a head-on collision between a passenger vehicle and a semitrailer. The wreck occurred at about 9 a.m. on Highway 13 at mile post 7, Utah Highway Patrol Sgt. Todd Royce said. The driver of the passenger vehicle was confirmed dead at the scene, Royce said. The victim was described as a man in his 20’s.  The identity of the victim was not released, pending notification of family members. Details of any other injuries were not available. Royce said the road would be closed until about 12 p.m. as troopers canvas the scene of the accident. Other details regarding the accident are unavailable.

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  • Top 5 Headlines to Know. Now.

    Top 5 stories to Know. Now. for July 2, 2015.  1. Patriotic breathing: Ogden's July 4 worst air of year.  Read story here.  2. Man accused of raping 9-year-old has case advanced.  Read story here.  3. When Monte Cristo was mysterious and isolated.  Read story here.  4. Motorists should plan ahead this July Fourth weekend.  Read story here.  5. Firework sales: Legal burden is on the customer.  Read story here. 

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  • VIDEO: Daily News Update

    In today’s Daily News Update fireworks keep fire crews busy in July plus 'Independents' Week' honors buy-local businesses and you don’t want to miss one local mayor’s Jimmy Fallon lip-sync impersonation.

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