• One of four missing jail inmates caught

    BRIGHAM CITY -- One of four walk-aways from the Box Elder County Jail was re-arrested and is back behind bars. Jail Commander Sandy Huthman said David Michael Corbett, 22, formerly of Honeyville, was picked up by the Utah Highway Patrol over the weekend. Still at large after failing to return to the jail in recent weeks while out on work-release are James Eric Dial, 30, Joel Matthew Myers, 27, and Jessica Dorothy Myers, 25. "All of them were close to getting out for good, and then they pull something like this," Huthman said. Details on Corbett's capture were not immediately available. The announcement of the four absconding inmates was posted to the Box Elder Sheriff's Office Facebook page Thursday, drawing 430 shares as of this morning. Dial has the longest record among the missing, with 14 convictions on theft and drug charges dating back to 2003, according to the state courts database, the only one among the four to earn prison time. All his cases are in Weber and Davis counties but for his May, 2014, arrest in Perry. He was pulled over by a patrolman for failing to dim his headlights, then found with methamphetamine in his possession, along with a syringe, according to charging documents, while driving on a suspended driver’s license because of a prior drunk-driving conviction. In combination with his Weber and Davis cases, in August, 2014, he was sentenced to drug court in Brigham City's 1st District Court. Originally from Kaysville, he's the only one among the escapees listed with an alias: James Bates and “Iceberg.” Corbett has seven convictions stretching back to 2011, five in Brigham City and two in Logan, typically thefts, along with a misdemeanor assault in 2012 and a misdemeanor resisting arrest in 2013. Those with the least serious criminal record appear to be Joel and Jessica Myers, husband and wife, according to court files. Both had been sentenced in 1st District Court last month to 180 days in jail for breaking into Joel Myers' mother's home in Howell, in northern Box Elder County, while she was out of town. They pleaded guilty to misdemeanor trespassing charges. They were discovered living there in May, according to charging documents. Myers' mother had banned the couple from her home for reasons not specified in a probable cause affidavit, even changing the locks on the home before she left. Jessica Myers in May had just finished serving 120 days in jail in Davis County on a credit card fraud charge for which she has also been ordered to pay more than $13,000 restitution. Formerly of Centerville, she was believed to be homeless at the time of her arrest on the case in November of last year, according to charging documents. Joel Myers has a 2007 conviction for attempted drug distribution in Brigham City. Their sentence included suspending their 180-day jail terms if they could keep a job on work release for four weeks.

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  • Annual local REVUE concert continues in Ogden

    Although he no longer takes his own gigs, well-known Ogden musician Hal “Holiday” Schneider isn’t slowing down. When he’s not spending his days singing for seniors in Ogden, he’s sharing the mic and hopping on stage with fellow locals, adding his own sense of flair for entertainment. “Most of the bands around town know who I am, a lot of them respect me,” Schneider said, adding that he’s sung with everyone from Danny Weldon to The Kap Brothers. Schneider has been in the music biz for years, over 50. A previous generation would remember his hits, “Sleigh Bell Rock,” and “Booze Party,” which got him into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. One of his favorite long-lasting gigs is his annual Hal Holiday Revue; this year marks the 12th concert held at the Ogden Amphitheater each summer. Schneider and the gang will take over the amphitheater July 15, as part of the free Wednesday night concert series. “We do a variety for all ages, old and young alike. I think the kids will really like that surprise song that we have planned. We draw the children,” he said. “I usually give away suckers, I throw out suckers or I tell all the kids to run up to the stage and I give them candy.” [image=s1] After his 10th revue, Schneider was ready to call it quits. The 11th concert was as much a surprise for him as it was for the fans he’s told it wasn’t going to happen. Schneider said two weeks before his show last year, someone came up to him at breakfast and showed him the callendar in the GO! Section, with his show listed inside. Schneider smiled as he recounted learning about his own show. “So the guys telling me, ‘I thought you weren’t doing your show,’ and I said, ‘I’m not!’ and he goes out and gets the GO! magazine and says, ‘there it is in the lineup.’ I says, ‘you’re kidding!’ so I call John Nicholas down at the theater, I says, ‘you got me doing that show?’ he says, ‘yeah you oughta do it, the people like it, blah blah,’” he said. This year Christy McBride from Ogden City reached out to Schneider, and he said she asked him and the revue to return to the Ogden Amphitheater for another year of family-friendly entertainment. Not wanting to let his fans, family and friends down, Schneider agreed. [image=s4] Locals Korene Greenwood and Scotty Haze will open up the show, just like last year. New this time is Jaecey Adams, a hula hoop extraordinaire who will take the stage for a 15-minute act. Schneider’s lineup also includes a set from the Traveling Senior Moment Band, where he sings and sometimes plays drums. ‘Prizes Galore!’ is also an expected and advertised feature of the annual Revue. “It’s free. When they get there, we give everyone a ticket and I give prizes away. Toward the end of the show I have someone come up and we draw the tickets,” he said. “If time allows, I want just a two-hour show, but if we have time, I’ll do a medley of the old rock ‘n’ roll, classic rock ‘n’ roll.” Although there is one song Schneider wanted to keep a surprise, he did say oldies like “Put Another Log on the Fire,” “Not Much Love Here Anymore,” “Hey Good Lookin’,” and “Louisiana Saturday Night” are all on the setlist. “So if you notice, we’ve got popular, country western, and we’re hoping to draw the older crowd, but we do draw the families. They come every time,” he said. “Hopefully, if my legs will carry me out to the audience, I want to get out to the audience.” [image=s3] Looking forward to the 13th annual, Schneider said he’s not making any promises. At his age, he can’t. Schneider said he envies Joe McQueen, and would “love to do 25 shows if Icould, you know?” “I’m just amazed that people still like to listen to my music,” he chuckled. “I’ll be 77 years old in October. You know what I said, as long as the people like what I do, I enjoy entertaining. I’ve been entertaining since I was 8 years old and as long as I can do what the people like, then I’ll keep doing it until I die.” Contact reporter Raychel Johnson at 801-625-4279 or rajohnson@standard.net. Follow her on Twitter @raychelNEWS. PREVIEW WHAT: Hal Holiday Revue WHEN: 8 p.m. July 15 WHERE: Ogden Amphitheater, 343 Historic 25th Street, Ogden ADMISSION: Free

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  • First Measles death in 12 years confirmed in America

    Officials in Washington confirmed that a woman died this spring after likely contracting measles at a Washington state hospital. The case is the first measles death in the U.S. since 2003

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  • The Standard Sport Show - July 6, 2015

    Joining the show today is Director of Rules and Competition for the Utah Golf Association, Jacob Miller. The Utah State Amateur Championship tees off today, featuring 288 golfers in the field looking to be crowned the 2015 Champion. Just how big is the State Am? Is there a future PGA player in the pool of players? Why does the UGA keep coming to Soldier Hollow every other year? Brandon and Jacob discuss this and more, on today’s edition of The Standard Sport Show.

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  • Top 5 Headlines to Know. Now.

    Top 5 stories to Know. Now. for Monday, July 6, 2015.  1. Woman and 2-year-old daughter injured in Ogden rollover.  Read story here.  2. City won't commit to changes sought by skateboarders.  Read story here.  3. Rehabilitation: Most prison inmates don't want help.  Read story here.  4. Crowds cool off under plenty of 'showers' at Kaysville parade.  Read story here.  5. Trash and binge drinking tarnish Weber River tubing.  Read story here. 

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  • VIDEO: Top of Utah Living

    In today’s show Angie stops by North Ogden’s new soda shop - Fiiz, located at 2700 N and 400 E. Joan sat down with Ashley Healy, the lead designer of the Manhattan Project for tips on decorating your home. For more tips visit her website at tmpslc.com. If you have a story idea for our show, email Angie at aerickson@standard.net or Joan at jodunn@standard.net.

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  • VIDEO: Daily News Update

    In today’s Daily News Update for July 6th, find out why Ogden City won’t commit to changes sought by skateboarders. Plus, a HOPE squad of teens learn how to help prevent suicide, and the Double Up Food Bucks program helps low-income families get more fresh items at farmers markets.

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  • VIDEO: Princess Dance Camp

    FARMINGTON — Kaylee Burningham, 15, has been dancing ever since she was 3, so when she went looking for a summer job to fit her schedule last year, she decided to use those skills by starting a princess dance camp. Now she is in her second summer showing young princesses how to twirl, plie, and do a pirouette, just like the princesses they are familiar with. Each day of the week-long camp the girls learn how to dance like a different princess, so the first day the girls dance like Elsa and Anna as they build an imaginary ice castle, dance like they have long hair similar to Rapunzel, or dance as if they are swimming in the sea like Ariel. “I’ve always done dance my whole life, and since at age 15 you can’t find a job very well, I just thought this would be an easy way to something I loved,” Kaylee said. During the first week of camp, a dozen young girls decked out in their favorite princess costume performed the creative dance Kaylee taught them, with their bodies swaying in motion to Elsa’s “Let it Go.” Burningham hopes she can pass on her love of dancing to the girls. “I love the kind of dancing where you are not wrong, using whatever combination I feel in my heart,” Kaylee said. “I think that dance isn’t all about competitions and who gets the biggest trophy. It’s about you doing what you love and when you do something beautiful, you feel great and can inspire others.” Teaching the young princesses reminds Kaylee of the time she learned to dance for the first time. “I don’t want to try and teach them what I think is right. I want them to have their own imagination, which combined with dance, creates something really awesome,” Kaylee said. “I hope these girls will learn the basic ideas of dance, especially ballet, and decide whether or not they love dance as much as I did.” Helen Duncan sat and watched her daughter, who was all smiles as she twirled around in her princess dress. “I think this is really good for the girls because they can be creative and gives them the opportunity to learn how to follow instructions at this age,” Duncan said. “Besides, I think they are all just beautiful.” Kaylee’s mom, Amber Burningham, says one of the best parts is seeing her daughter bring the world of imagination to young girls. “I just get so excited seeing all of these little princesses using their imaginations to be in this fancy world,” Burningham said. “I don’t know what it is about little girls that is so magical, but it is fun to watch them.” Five-year-old Sidney Macauly in between dances said her favorite part was “listening to the songs like we dance because it feels nice and I like it.” Burningham said her daughter is not only bringing the world of imagination to young girls, but gaining valuable life skills in the process. “She’s had to learn how to call and talk to people and organize the lessons, which are life lessons,” Burningham said. Even though Kaylee admits it was challenging getting everything coordinated for the camps, knowing she was able to plan it around her busy summer schedule and still earn enough money, made all the effort worth it. “I want them to feel free to do what they want and be happy,” Kaylee said. “They are usually all smiling and really happy here and the parents love watching their daughter dance around in a princess dress.”

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  • City won't commit to changes sought by skateboarders

    OGDEN — Local skateboarders would like to see improvements to the Lorin Farr Skate Park and more upkeep by the city, but officials want proof the users will help. About a year and a half ago the city put a lock on the park because of continued graffiti, fighting, gang situations, littering and drug use on the premises. Patrons sawed off the lock and skated anyway. So, the city locked the park again and made it nearly impossible for skaters to get in and put up a sign saying that until patrons could “clean up their act” the park would remain closed. Ogden Parks Director Perry Huffaker said after that, loyal park patrons approached him and he and other city officials met with a small group of skaters to help get the park cleaned up. And it has worked. Before, there was graffiti on more than a weekly basis, and now it happens only every few months. Fighting and drug use hasn’t been a huge issue, either. Now patrons would like to see some upgrades and expansion to the park and also to have the park protected from flooding when heavy rains hit. “This was pretty much like a swimming pool,” said skater and manager of Crossroads Skate, Taylor Gallegos. “We were trying to shovel the water out,” he added. Huffaker said there was a water problem during the heavy rains a few weeks ago, but that is because the current drainage system goes into the Weber River. When park officials have to clean graffiti at the park they have to use special chemicals that can’t go into the river and have to plug the drains. “It was really a timing thing. We had so much rain and just couldn’t get to it because of all the rain,” Huffaker said of the flooding. [gmap=41.237134, -111.958947] Gallegos said they would like to see a better drainage system and some of the cracks removed. “The concrete is rough,” Gallegos said. But, he tries not to complain because he and the base of skaters that use the park love it and don’t want it go away. “I know this one gets skated more than any other from here to Layton. People love it,” he said. Kenzie Cloyd and her partner, Tony Poselli, have started Ogden Reborn in an effort to fix the old park and add a plaza with trees. They said they have started a petition at www.ipetitions.com in hopes of gathering 3,000 signatures to let the city know that the community wants an updated park. “The city has not promised us anything at this time. We chose a fair amount of signatures for our goal; the higher the amount, the better of a chance of this happening,” Cloyd said. “Mayor Caldwell has been pushing incredible changes for this city, so I truly don't think he would be opposed.” [image=Secondary BS 063015 Ogden Skatepark 04-2] Jesse Edge, of Ogden, has been skating at the Lorin Farr Skate Park for six years in Ogden on Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Skateboarders are petitioning for upgrades to the park but the city is hesitant because they believe the patrons are abusing the park with graffiti, drugs and fights. Huffaker said he isn’t opposed to making good changes to the park, but he needs to know that the park will be taken care of and not go back to the way things were. “There are still usable ramps and at the time (it was built) all the materials were upper end,” Huffaker said. “I’ve still been going back and forth and I need everybody to be on board,” Huffaker said about updating the park. He has been impressed with the way the core group of skaters has worked with the city to improve the park, but it still needs to stand the test of time. “Like with everything, there is a really great core of people, but a few have to ruin it for everybody else.” Cloyd would like to see the improvements made to the park and have skate competitions and exhibitions there to raise money to help the park even more. “I believe this needs to happen because of how rapidly Ogden is growing. Skating is loved by all ages in Ogden and Idon't think it's fair they don't have a great place to practice,” Cloyd said.

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  • America celebrates Independence Day with fireworks, parades

    Americans celebrated 239 years as an independent nation on Saturday with extravagant fireworks displays, rock and classical concerts and parades both big and small. Here were some highlights of Independence Day festivities around the nation: SPECTATORS BRAVE TIGHT SECURITY FOR NYC FIREWORKS SHOW Hundreds of thousands of people braved tight security along New York City’s East River to watch the annual Macy’s Fourth of July fireworks display. Minneapolis resident Joe Cunningham said Saturday’s fireworks show was “awesome” and lived up to his family’s expectations. Cunningham said New York’s show will be the benchmark for all other fireworks displays. Macy’s said the 25-minute show featured more than 50,000 shells set off from five barges on the river. The fireworks show was broadcast on NBC. The tight security included officers searching backpacks and purses. Other officers used hand-held radiation detectors to scan baby carriages and large suitcases. OBAMA TELLS SERVICE MEMBERS FREEDOM IS PAID FOR BY MILITARY MEN, WOMEN President Barack Obama says U.S. service members make it possible to enjoy the “incredible blessings” in the greatest country on earth. He says “freedom is not free” but is paid for by all the men and women of the military, including those who blanketed the White House South Lawn for a concert in their honor by Bruno Mars. Obama spoke minutes before the annual Fourth of July fireworks lit up the night sky over the National Mall. He was accompanied by Michelle Obama. Heavy rain that soaked Washington all day forced the White House to cancel its annual Fourth of July picnic for members of the military and their families. The USO military service organization sponsored the concert that featured a performance by Mars. GAY RIGHTS ACTIVISTS MARK LANDMARK 1965 DEMONSTRATION Gay rights activists gathered in front of Independence Hall in Philadelphia on the Fourth of July to mark the progress of their movement and pay tribute to those who launched it a half-century ago. But they also made it clear that the fight for equality was far from over. LGBT activist Aisha Moodie-Mills hailed the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriages nationwide, but said in many places “you can still get married on Sunday and then fired on Monday.” Organizers remembered some of the earliest gay rights marches, including a gathering of about 40 protesters in the same location on July 5, 1965 calling for equality. They called that a bold and courageous act by the standards of the day, when homosexuals could be arrested for intimate acts even in the privacy of their own homes. PIT SPITTING A 15-year-old girl won the women’s division of the 42nd annual cherry spitting contest in Eau Claire, Michigan, by sending a pit farther than anyone else: 49 1/4 feet. “I just took a deep breath and pushed hard,” said Megan Ankrapp of Buchanan. “I was shocked.” Kevin Bartz won the championship with a spit of 48 feet and 8 inches. Ankrapp was not allowed to participate in the overall championship round because her earlier spits were too short to qualify. Bartz said he was excited to finally beat Brian Krause, the 2014 champ, but then realized a teenager had sent a pit farther than he did. “I look up and say, ‘Wait a minute. One of the girls beat me,‘” said Bartz, 48. “It’s not quite as exciting.” NEW CITIZENS SWORN IN Naturalization ceremonies big and small were held across the U.S. The director of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ Baltimore district administered the oath of allegiance to 40 people from 27 countries during a ceremony at The Engineers Club in Baltimore. In Plymouth, Vermont, 20 people became U.S. citizens at the President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site. The great-granddaughter of President and Mrs. Coolidge sang the national anthem. Officials say over 4,000 new citizens were welcomed in more than 50 naturalization ceremonies across the country from July 1 through July 4. PRESIDENTIAL HOPEFULS CAMPAIGN IN PARADES Parades across Iowa and New Hampshire were clear reminders of the race for the White House: Red balloons promoting “Jeb! 2016,” a tractor draped in a Rick Perry banner and dutiful volunteers holding signs and chanting. Former Govs. Jeb Bush of Florida, Rick Perry of Texas and Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island as well as South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham worked the crowd in Amherst, while Hillary Rodham Clinton marched in a parade in New Hampshire’s North Country. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio spent the holiday in New Hampshire’s Lakes Region, as Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley met voters in Iowa. NATHAN’S HOT DOG EATING CONTEST Matt Stonie devoured 62 wieners and buns in 10 minutes to upset Joey “Jaws” Chestnut in the annual hot dog eating contest at Nathan’s Famous in Coney Island, breaking Chestnut’s bid for a ninth straight victory. Stonie beat Chestnut by two wieners. Both are from San Jose, California. The third-place finisher ate 35 hot dogs. Defending champion Miki Sudo won the women’s division by devouring 38 wieners and buns in 10 minutes. She downed four more hot dogs than last year and bested Sonya “Black Widow” Thomas of Alexandria, Virginia, who ate 31 wieners. This story has been corrected to show that third-place finisher in men’s contest ate 35 hot dogs, not 32. A HISTORIC CANDY DROP A pilot who delivered candy to children in Berlin at the end of World War II parachuted sweets down to Orem, Utah, to celebrate Independence Day. Gail Halvorsen, 94, also known as the “Candy Bomber,” dropped 1,000 chocolate bars attached to tiny parachutes at Scera Park on Friday. He flew over the area three times before releasing the cargo into the hands of the children below. Deb Jackson, co-chair of the event, estimated more than 50,000 people stood in 100-degree Fahrenheit temperatures to watch the 4 p.m. drop. Halvorsen flew in a fixed-wing bomber from World War II with two escort planes attending, the Daily Herald of Provo reported. Washington.

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  • VIDEO: Royal family gathers for christening

    ENGLAND  — Britain's royal family gathered at St. Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham on Sunday for the christening of Princess Charlotte. Hundreds of fans outside St. Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, a sprawling royal estate near England's eastern coast, cheered as William and Kate arrived with toddler Prince George and 9-week-old Charlotte, who was in a vintage pram. It was only the second time Britain's newborn princess, who is fourth in line to the throne, has been seen in public since she was born on May 2. Like her elder brother George, Charlotte was dressed for the occasion in a replica of the intricate lace-and-satin christening gown made for Queen Victoria's eldest daughter, also named Victoria, in 1841. Until 2008, that original gown had been worn by all royal babies - including the queen - at their christenings.

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  • President Obama thanks military families

    President Barack Obama says U.S. service members make it possible to enjoy the "incredible blessings" in the greatest country on earth. He says freedom is not free but is paid for by all the men and women of the military. Obama spoke minutes before the annual Fourth of July fireworks lit up the night sky over the National Mall.

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