This patient is no dummy: High-tech mannequin helps EMTs train

May 24 2012 - 10:11am

Images

JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
Roy firefighters and paramedics Tim Vega and Mark Storey train on SimMan 3G. The wireless simulation mannequin can breathe, cry, moan, sweat, bleed, seize and vomit, among other things.
JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
SimMan 3G, a wireless simulation mannequin, actually produces “blood” to help EMS personnel train on treating life-threatening injuries.
JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
EMS workers intubate SimMan, a wireless simulation mannequin, and begin pumping oxygen into its lungs.
JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
Roy firefighters and paramedics Tim Vega and Mark Storey train on SimMan 3G. The wireless simulation mannequin can breathe, cry, moan, sweat, bleed, seize and vomit, among other things.
JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
A computer can control the SimMan and also detect errors and accuracy in treatment.
JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
Roy firefighters and paramedics Tim Vega and Mark Storey train on SimMan 3G. The wireless simulation mannequin can breathe, cry, moan, sweat, bleed, seize and vomit, among other things.
JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
SimMan 3G, a wireless simulation mannequin, actually produces “blood” to help EMS personnel train on treating life-threatening injuries.
JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
EMS workers intubate SimMan, a wireless simulation mannequin, and begin pumping oxygen into its lungs.
JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
Roy firefighters and paramedics Tim Vega and Mark Storey train on SimMan 3G. The wireless simulation mannequin can breathe, cry, moan, sweat, bleed, seize and vomit, among other things.
JAMIE LAMPROS/Standard-Examiner correspondent
A computer can control the SimMan and also detect errors and accuracy in treatment.

OGDEN -- A 37 year-old man was unconscious and bleeding. His heart raced and his blood pressure dropped. Emergency Medical Technicians worked hard to stabilize him.

Then, the man stopped breathing.

Mike Storey and Tim Vega, of Roy fire and paramedics department, inserted a breathing tube and began pumping oxygen into the man's lungs. After several chest compressions, the man's eyes opened and he began moaning.

This trauma victim wasn't real. Instead, it's a wireless simulation mannequin called SimMan 3G.

Four of the simulators were on hand at Ogden Regional Medical Center recently during its annual EMS education and appreciation day workshop. The goal was to further train emergency workers how to help people during a serious medical situation.

A person controlling the computer can make the Sim patient do everything from moan, cry, sweat, bleed, vomit, cry, seize, and even deliver a baby.

"Not only can I increase the heart rate or make it have a stroke or a spinal injury, I can also see if they are treating it correctly," said Bob Jacob, corporate account executive with Laerdal, the makers of the simulator. "Everything is controlled through the computer system. It's very sophisticated and lifelike."

Ogden Regional Medical Center trauma nurse coordinator, Deanna Wolfe, said several physicians and nurses at the hospital took the day off to help train EMS personnel.

"They get to sit down and go over case studies and issues they face out in the field," she said. "The simulators recreate pretty much everything they have to deal with, so by practicing on them, it makes them better prepared to respond to real life situations."

Storey said even though SimMan looks like a plastic mannequin, working on it is as close to the real thing as you can get.

"The effects are close enough that it pulls your mind right into the situation as if it were the real deal," he said. "This is really good for us because it's hard to get structured education and training. We're extremely busy but we also have budget restraints, so we are very appreciative."

South Ogden Fire Capt. Bill Stoddard said the child birth simulator was very lifelike.

"This is just how it is in the field," he said. "And this is state of the art training. They are presenting scenarios that happen every day out on the field from strokes to heart attacks to seizures to delivering babies. Their eyes blink, they breathe. It's very leading edge and it's great to be able to interact with the doctors and nurses because in real-life situations we see each other for seconds. We deliver the patient to them, give them the run down and we're gone."

Robert Jex, program manager at the Bureau of EMS, said Ogden Regional is being used as a model for other hospital and EMS training.

"Hospital staff and EMS communication is critical and Ogden Regional is providing a very unique opportunity for everyone to get together and work on the same scenarios they deal with every day," Jex said. "Everyone appreciates being appreciated and this hospital does a wonderful job relaying that to the EMS folks out there."

Karlene Marshall, disaster director at Ogden Regional, said in addition to learning with the simulators, workshops were given in the areas of resuscitation, radio communication, cardiac cases, airway, pain and narcotics and sepsis.

"We started having luncheons for the EMS way back in the 1980s and we decided we wanted to expand that a few years ago and start incorporating education and training," she said. "It's a win-win situation for all of us."

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